which camera?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by sdgmusic, Mar 28, 2007.

  1. sdgmusic

    sdgmusic TPF Noob!

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    I am an amateur/semi pro photographer looking at getting my first DSLR. I am between the Nikon D40 and D80. I realize that the D80 is double the price of the D40, I just wanted some input. I have heard that extra lenses for the D40 are few and far between. Exspansion might be nexcessary. any thoughts?
     
  2. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    It's not so much that the lenses are few and far between; there are plenty of lenses that will fit on the D40. The problem is that those lenses which use a 'screwdriver' motor rather than internal focus will not autofocus on the D40; you will have to focus manually which is of course possible but not necessarily convenient. These include standard prime lenses and others there is a reasonable chance you will want at some point.
     
  3. sdgmusic

    sdgmusic TPF Noob!

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    is this the same for the D40 X?
     
  4. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    Afraid so.
     
  5. yvonk

    yvonk TPF Noob!

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    I'm new to DSLR cameras also, and my question might sound stupid, but ain't it better to have no auto focus? So you can focus what you really want?

    Also, I'm looking between the D40 & D70... don't know which one to buy yet.
    But another question to y'all- Can the D70 take pictures under the rain? I heard the D40 couldn't because he didn't have a special case or something like that...
     
  6. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    Doesn't sound at all stupid to me... some folks would agree that manual focus is better for the most precice focus, gives you more control, definitely the way to go for hyperfocal distance... others would say autofocus is faster for them and is precise and intuitive enough. Personally I've always preferred manual focus, but when using autofocus cameras I tend to use autofocus most of the time since their viewfinders and focusing screens (not to mention lenses) are designed for that rather than aiding manual focus. But then other people are happy to use manual focus all the time with modern AF cameras. It's just a question of choice.


    I don't think either are designed to operate for long in the rain. Very few cameras are now... generally only the more expensive ones. With Nikon I think that means the D200 and upwards. Having said that, I don't suppose a few drops would fry the electronics. Besides, you could always make your own covering - a plastic bag doesn't cost much - and if you intend to use it in wet conditions very often then no doubt someone will make a dedicated waterproof housing.
     
  7. Funky

    Funky TPF Noob!

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    im a little confused with the alpha's a100's waterproofness <---is that a word? lol, ive used it in downpors ive even dropped it in the ocean (kinda, i got hit by a wave while taking pictures) and it still works perfectly, kinda confused since its a "pro-sumor" dslr.
     
  8. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    My guess would be that some degree of sealing is standard; you couldn't have all dSLRs giving up at the slightest hint of moisture (as point-&-shoots often do), but no doubt the extent or quality of sealing is different with various cameras. Companies these days tend not to pass up any marketing opportunity so I'd imagine if they're not advertising a camera as water-resistant then they're not confident that it is; of course it may still be resistant enough for the odd drop or splash.
     
  9. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I think the downside to using manual focus on modern AF DSLR's is that they don't have an optical focusing aid like a split image. They do normally have a little LED that lights when you are focused at the same point that auto focus would achieve. If you use the LED as the focusing aid, you might as well save the time and use auto focus because you are getting the same result. If you use the viewfinder ground glass, you will have more flexibility but probably less accuracy because there is no optical focusing aid. For me, manual focus isn't very practical on an autofocus camera. For others it seems to work fine.

    You should be able to get the result you want with AF. Just focus where you want things, press the shutter release half way to lock the focus and compose. It works pretty well for me.
     

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