advice on tripod

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by scooter2044, Jun 3, 2015.

  1. scooter2044

    scooter2044 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 10, 2015
    Messages:
    396
    Likes Received:
    185
    Location:
    South Central Pennsylvania
    I'm looking to buy a tripod and found this one. Does anyone know if this is suitable for a beginner who wants to take BIF and landscape photos?

    Vanguard Alta Pro 264AB 4-Section Aluminum Tripod with SBH-100 Ball Head


     
  2. ronlane

    ronlane What's next?

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2012
    Messages:
    10,026
    Likes Received:
    4,601
    Location:
    Mustang Oklahoma
    I have a vanguard tripod and ball head. I love them but the one thing that I would verify is the weight that the sbh-100 head can hold and compare that to your camera gear.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Wizard1500

    Wizard1500 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2014
    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    88
    Location:
    Florida
    I have the Vanguard Alta Pro 263AB 3-Section Aluminum Tripod with SBH-100 Ball Head. I really like it. I agree with Ron about verifying the weight of your camera gear.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  4. ronlane

    ronlane What's next?

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2012
    Messages:
    10,026
    Likes Received:
    4,601
    Location:
    Mustang Oklahoma
    Went back and looked at mine and I have the 263AP and bought a SBH-250 for it about a month later. The 250 will hold like 44 lbs.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. fjrabon

    fjrabon TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2011
    Messages:
    3,644
    Likes Received:
    755
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA, USA
    I have the SBH 100 head on my carbon fiber vanguard. It'll easily hold my D7100 and 80-200 f/2.8 ED rock solidly.
     
  6. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    48,229
    Likes Received:
    18,870
    Location:
    USA
  7. fjrabon

    fjrabon TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2011
    Messages:
    3,644
    Likes Received:
    755
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA, USA
  8. JacaRanda

    JacaRanda Hobbyist Birdographer

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2012
    Messages:
    5,472
    Likes Received:
    2,600
    Location:
    Orange County California
    It will require lots of patience and practice trying to get birds in flight with any tripod.
     
  9. JoeW

    JoeW TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2013
    Messages:
    1,872
    Likes Received:
    902
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    Okay, it's difficult to answer you. It's not b/c that's a bad tripod. It's that what's a good tripod depends on the shooter.

    You said landscapes and birds in flight. Well, if you have to hike a distance to get there than you want a tripod that is light and will attach to a backpack easily. If you're doing long exposures then you want a tripod that is rock solid (and that either means carbon composite build or a heavy sucker). If you're going to be looking through your viewfinder a lot (waiting for a bird to take flight before you snap...meaning...timing is everything) than you want a tripod that telescopes to your height (that's an issue b/c often times for stability, I won't raise my center column on my manfrottos). And the point others have mentioned about weight--I suspect you either are or in the future will be shooting with a 400mm bazooka. You will want a tripod that can handle that weight and maybe allow provisions for spikes (in to the ground) OR sand-bags (to stabilize) so while your camera is on your tripod for 2 hours as you sit for the eaglets to do something interesting, a stiff wind doesn't catch your top heavy tripod and blow it over.

    It is impossible to find a tripod that is great at everything. I have one that fits in to carry-on luggage (but I sacrifice stability and height). I have another that is rock-solid stable with a tillable center column (ideal for food, macro, and product photography). But I would never want to go hiking with it. I have a small gorillapod that attaches to my holster--great for street photography and moving around the city. I have clamps I can use indoors when some places ban tripods ("gee officer, it's not a tripod, I've just clamped my camera to my chair"). Be clear about what you want it to do best and then choose accordingly.
     
  10. scooter2044

    scooter2044 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 10, 2015
    Messages:
    396
    Likes Received:
    185
    Location:
    South Central Pennsylvania
    Sorry, I shouldn't have said BIF. I will stick to handheld for those. But the stationary ones, and the landscape I could use it for.
     
  11. scooter2044

    scooter2044 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 10, 2015
    Messages:
    396
    Likes Received:
    185
    Location:
    South Central Pennsylvania
    I like the price of your suggestion better, but I like the 360 degree rotation of the one I found so I did a little more research. From what I can tell, I think the only difference between the two is the 264 is taller (which I don't need). If that's the case, then I'll go with the cheaper one you recommended. Unless you know of any other differences. Thanks, you just saved me 40 bucks. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2015
  12. scooter2044

    scooter2044 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 10, 2015
    Messages:
    396
    Likes Received:
    185
    Location:
    South Central Pennsylvania


    I just have a Canon T3i with 2 kit lenses, so no worries on the weight. I won't be upgrading anytime soon. Thanks.
     
    • Like Like x 1

Share This Page