Beginner photos, looking for critique.

aguerra.1993

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Hello, I have a few photos I took today, I would really appreciate opinions and where I can better myself. None of these are edited, as i don't know how to edit pictures yet and all were shot on a Canon T3i with the kit 18-55mm lens. The day was a little cloudy and overcast so it made it a little hard but here they are. Thanks for any help, it is greatly appreciated.

This one was taken with a shutter speed of 1/400, F 9.0, and ISO 100


This next one was 1/1000, F 11.0, and ISO 200


Next, was at 1/500, F 14, and ISO 200


And this last one at 1/250, F 22, and ISO 200.
 
The first one is quite pleasing. There might be some improvements possible, but let's move on...

The second two are quite grey and dull looking. The object sticking out into the water is a good idea, but I feel that it's a little too vertical in the frame. In the second one it's trying to lead the eye to somewhere, but where? This would be more pleasing if the angle was less steep, less vertical, but you're in the right general direction here. Find a better spot to stand, so that thing can point to something interesting (maybe even a boat on the water, or a duck, or a bright patch of sunlight -- or a building, that's ok too) and be less steep.

The third one, you've turned the interesting object into the water into a mere framing device by making it vertical in the frame AND cramming it against the edge. No good.

The fourth one, it's a nice pavilion thing, but I'm not very interested in it. The garbage cans, the little tree, the light pole are all contending for attention. It looks like you might be thinking about light and shadow, and that's good. I think possibly a different time of day and a different angle might give more prominence to the object you want me to look it.
 
I like the first, could use some cropping at the bottom though.
Almost like the second but those pesky leaves wreck it for me.
3rd and 4th don't do much for me (you've got a bit of lens flare in 4th which really doesn't help)

My advice is to shoot when the light's more interesting and bone up on composition.
 
I didn't even notice the leaves in the second one, I'm glad you pointed that out. I can agree with all the comments you have said as well. I guess a problem I just need to look at more pictures of things and just detail them and see what I can incorporate into my own photos. I will go back very soon at about the time the sun begins to go down, maybe give me some better lighting. I can see now in the third one that it isn't a very good one at all.
 
Don't leave it too late, the half hour before the sun goes down is a good time, lovely golden light.
 
I'd agree with what has been said above.

It's looks like you live in a great place to be taking photos.

Grab your tripod and get out during one of the golden hours, either just after sunrise, or just before sunset.

Watch your composition. Don't be afraid to mix it up, get low down, spend some time finding the right angle.

Most importantly...have fun =]
 
Yeah, i have a great advantage living in Puerto Rico. From my house i can drive 30 minutes and be where these pictures were taken, or drive 30 minutes the other way and be at the top of some mountains with great scenery. Only thing is this month is the rainy one here, but if the weather isn't that bad, I will wake up before sunrise and see how the light affects my photos. Thanks for all the help everyone!
 
For taking still subjects such as in your photos, you don't need to be shooting with anything higher than 100 ISO in those bright lighting conditions. I'm not too familiar with your lens but I would guess you could benefit from shooting at lower F stops (ex. F/8 vs f/22). I like your photos but they could benefit from some post processing.
 
To me, these are just normal photographs. Try to get low or try a different angle to get a different perspective. Anybody could have taken these.
 
Also the second photo shot 1/1000 second shutter speed for a still image is way way way faster then needed.
 
Took into consideration the tips you guys gave, went out at sunrise to take pictures and it was very cloudy and overcast. How do you guys take pictures in these conditions without making the sky look over exposed? Here are what i think were the good ones from today. I will also upload more tonight from a local skateboard event.

Shutter 2"8, F/29, ISO 100
1.

Shutter 2"5, F/25, ISO 100
2.

Shutter 1", F/22, ISO 100
3.

Shutter 1/30, F/9, ISO 100
4.
 
Such is life, you were out at the right time but the light was bad, there's not much you can do about that just shoot accordingly, in those circumstances I'd just not bother with trying to get the sky in a composition, even when exposed correctly it'll be dull. All but the last are a little overexposed.

Why are you using such a tight aperture? your lens will not be at it's best closed down like that and the light doesn't warrant it.

are you shooting in raw or JPG? The exposure settings you're using won't help but even so the colours look flat, if you're not going to do any editing yet then you'll be better off using JPG and getting the camera JPG settings optimised.
 
I am using JPG. I don't really know why I am using the small aperture, I just set it that way to put a longer shutter speed but I honestly don't have the basics completely down yet. Will it work better at around f/8-ish? By the way, these pictures were taken without a tripod. I had to lay on some rocks and look to see which ones were almost flat. It was a pain and I am definitely looking into tripods now.
 
F8 - F11 should be about optimal for a kit zoom, you could safely rack up the ISO a couple of stops too if shutter speed is still too slow.
 
Such is life, you were out at the right time but the light was bad, there's not much you can do about that just shoot accordingly, in those circumstances I'd just not bother with trying to get the sky in a composition, even when exposed correctly it'll be dull. All but the last are a little overexposed.

Why are you using such a tight aperture? your lens will not be at it's best closed down like that and the light doesn't warrant it.

are you shooting in raw or JPG? The exposure settings you're using won't help but even so the colours look flat, if you're not going to do any editing yet then you'll be better off using JPG and getting the camera JPG settings optimised.

I think he was shooting like that to get longer exposure on the water?
 

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