black and white film gear

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by pocketshaver, May 8, 2019.

  1. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Rangefinders are really good with 35mm and 50mm lenses...and have a few 75mm offerings; 90mm was about the longest semi-common rfdr. focal length historically. Due to the viewfinder issues, and short rfdr. base lengths, lenses like 135mm and longer were seldom seen, but there were a few long lenses, often designed for use on the Leica-made "Visoflex", which turned a Leica into in effect, a reflex camera,and the lenses used part of the reflex housing as part of the flange-focal distance, and are not especially common compared to other M-mount lenses. Sometime called "short mount" Leica lenses, they have become less and less commonly seen on the used market over the past 40 years.

    For telephoto lenses,and close-up and macro work,and photomicrography, the 35mm single lens reflex is the most-natural , easiest-to-use choice. since one looks directly through the "taking" lens. There are no zooms for rangefinders, although Leica did make the "Tri-Elmar, a three-focal-length lens, which many are unaware, can shoot between the marked focal lengths.

    Rangefinders have a few strengths, which are not shared by 35mm SLR camera. Lighter, simpler, more-rugged, few parts, in the case of Leica and Contax, incredible lenses.

    See www.cameraquest.com for some good background articles on rfdr 35mm cameras of the past 90 years.


     
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  2. vintagesnaps

    vintagesnaps Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I have a Canon with QL but not sure which one... it's OK but the shutter release is recessed so is a hindrance in being quick to release the shutter, and the focus assist that I thought might be helpful isn't all that much...

    Any SLR you like or any rangefinder would be fine shooting B&W. I've done both, either works fine. It is harder to find longer lenses for rangefinders so that's either an advantage or disadvantage depending on what you're doing and how you like to shoot. I use them in different ways, and want an SLR if I want to be quick about it or use a short telephoto. For me a rangefinder takes a little more thought about framing a shot.
     
  3. pocketshaver

    pocketshaver TPF Noob!

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    right now my camera is a canon ftb with canon50mm 1:1.8 S.C. lens and a vivitar 62mm 75-205mm 1:3.8 MC micro focusing zoom


    Id like to have a camera just dedicated to black and white film. that hopefully has the ability to use a macro lens.
     
  4. ac12

    ac12 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Why not another FTb ?
    The advantage is identical controls, and same lens mount.

    BTW, I shot B&W for YEARS with a SLR.
    As was said, macro is not a strength of a RF camera.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2019
  5. texxter

    texxter No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    My favorite film camera is the Olympus OM-1 with a Zuiko 50mm f1.4 lens. Small, built like a tank, simple, great image quality. And cheap. P8.jpg
     
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  6. ac12

    ac12 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I remember when my cousin showed me his OM1. I thought what a toy, compared to my Nikon.
    But now as a senior citizen, I am seeing his wisdom of a lighter kit. :icon_thumbsup:
     
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  7. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Earlier this week a forum member had some used cameras for sale at reasonable prices.,and among them was a Canon F-1 (n)?new-style F-1? For,as I recall, $135 or $165. A really SOLID, system camera from the mid- to late-1970's. Really a nice machine. Have you considered an F-1 or F-1n?
     
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  8. pocketshaver

    pocketshaver TPF Noob!

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    F-1 from what I can see is the previous generation of the FTB-n that I have. Good little girl. Very solid.

    Its funny how all the 100% mechanical cameras after 1965 have a light meter that NEEDS a battery to function, or how you can get correct usage of that camera without a light meter.
     
  9. ac12

    ac12 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    The F1 is an earlier generation than your FTb-N, but not the previous generation of the FTb-N. The previous generation of the FTb-N was the FTb. The FTb was a related but different line of cameras than the F1.
    The F1 was the pro camera, the FTb was the consumer camera.
    The Nikon equivalent was the Nikon F series pro cameras, and the Nikkormat was the consumer camera. This was before Nikon merged the Nikkormat line into the Nikon line, for marketing purposes.

    #1 - There were cameras with selenium meters, which did not need a battery. CdS meters need a power source (battery) to work.
    If your statement referred to the presence of a meter, there were cameras without meters; such as Nikon F series with standard (non-metered) prism, Hasselblad C and CM500, most of the TLRs, and others.

    #2 - True since the early 1900s (and earlier) till today with a dSLR in manual mode. The "Sunny-16" rule, still works.
    I first shot 35mm film, using the instruction sheet in the box of film. I cut out the guide and tapped it to the back of the camera.
     
  10. vintagesnaps

    vintagesnaps Been spending a lot of time on here!

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  11. Nathaniel S.

    Nathaniel S. TPF Noob!

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    Why not just get another FTb?

    Or a Bell & Howell FD 35? (It is a re-branded FTb)

    As for macro lenses, there is the Canon FD 50mm f/3.5 and 100mm f/4. Both are sharp when stopped down to f/8 on my original Sony A7. They should perform better on film as the A7 has a thick filter stack over the sensor.

    Even better than the Canon lenses are the Komine 55mm f/2.8 and 90mm f/2.8. Both of those lenses are sold under the Vivitar brand. You can tell the Vivitar lenses made by Komine as their serial numbers begin with 28.

    The Komine lenses don't need an extension tube to reach 1:1. They were also sharp at f/5.6 when I was testing with my A7. They come in multiple lens mounts, so it might take a bit of time to find one in a FD mount.
     
  12. dxqcanada

    dxqcanada Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Canon FTB-n - 1973
    Canon F-1N - 1976
    both use the PX625 battery only for the light meter
    ... and my F-1N was going for cheap CAD$165 ... which means it is almost free to you Americans
    You might have liked the Canon P rangefinder that I also was selling ... no battery
     

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