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smoke665

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As I keep saying I'm no portrait tog but I'd be delighted with these. She has a wonderful smile and always looks so happy.
 
As I keep saying I'm no portrait tog but I'd be delighted with these. She has a wonderful smile and always looks so happy.
I'm a blind pig in the woods, every now and then I find an acorn. LOL She does make it easier though. Thanks for the kind words.

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The sweetest face I've seen today… thanks for the pleasure! :encouragement:
Thank you!!!!!!!!!!! She's my shadow in the studio.
 
Oh, gosh, smoke. Brutally adorable. I think her face in the first shot is beautifully lit. Your captures will be treasured forever. The last shot gives me a feeling she's looking into the future - I want to tell Lil Bit to stay Lil !!!!
 
Oh, gosh, smoke. Brutally adorable. I think her face in the first shot is beautifully lit. Your captures will be treasured forever. The last shot gives me a feeling she's looking into the future - I want to tell Lil Bit to stay Lil !!!!

I'm humbled by your comments. I like to use a three light set with her, a 6' brolly with diffusion, a 2x4 soft box with diffuser, and a boomed 7" kicker with 10 degree grid. This setup gives me a zone on the key and fill, but keeping up with her on the kicker takes full time assistant tracking her.
 
I'm a blind pig in the woods, every now and then I find an acorn. LOL She does make it easier though. Thanks for the kind words.


Thank you!!!!!!!!!!! She's my shadow in the studio.

I agree with your comment.
A GOOD subject makes a world of difference to a photog like me, who normally does not shoot portraits.

I'm jealous of portrait photogs who effortlessly connect with and direct their subjects.
 
She's lucky to have you to give her memories she will enjoy for years and years! These are great just like all the other sets I have seen you share over the years now.
 
'm jealous of portrait photogs who effortlessly connect with and direct their subjects.
I've shot a wide range of subjects from kids to adults, there's no way of knowing till you get them in studio as to how they'll react. Some freak out over the lights, some get so fascinated with everything going on they fail to connect with the camera, and some freeze up like a deer in the headlights. I've found that constant banter with them, helps to get the focus on me rather than what's going on around them, it's a two way street, you can tell when you're locked in to them. That's why I like to shoot tethered, with the camera on a tripod, it allows me to take in the whole set, and they're making eye contact with me, rather than the camera (which just happens to be in the right spot as well)
 
I've shot a wide range of subjects from kids to adults, there's no way of knowing till you get them in studio as to how they'll react. Some freak out over the lights, some get so fascinated with everything going on they fail to connect with the camera, and some freeze up like a deer in the headlights. I've found that constant banter with them, helps to get the focus on me rather than what's going on around them, it's a two way street, you can tell when you're locked in to them. That's why I like to shoot tethered, with the camera on a tripod, it allows me to take in the whole set, and they're making eye contact with me, rather than the camera (which just happens to be in the right spot as well)

That reminds me of the old photo studios.
Photog would setup the view camera, then step to the side, so he could make eye contact with the subject, and fired off the camera with a bulb release.
So many today hide behind the camera, and ignore the value of the tripod, in that environment.

The other is that the studio camera could be lowered to be level with the child or seated adult, so he wasn't shooting down on the subject, like I see some photogs today doing, shooting everything while standing.
 
That reminds me of the old photo studios.
Photog would setup the view camera, then step to the side, so he could make eye contact with the subject, and fired off the camera with a bulb release

So are you insinuating I'm old? Yes I have a bulb release with a long hose, but I don't use it, because an "old" man doesn't need anything in the floor to trip on, and I got rid of the old camera dolly with the counter weight years ago. LOL
 
So are you insinuating I'm old? Yes I have a bulb release with a long hose, but I don't use it, because an "old" man doesn't need anything in the floor to trip on, and I got rid of the old camera dolly with the counter weight years ago. LOL

I lost my bulb release, but have been thinking about getting another one.
Yeah, tripping over things has been getting more common as I get older.

I got a tripod dolly for my studio tripod. But I have let to use it.
If I ever set up my home studio, after I clean out the garage, I would love a camera stand/dolly. My back does not like bending over very much any more.
 
@ac12 having a clean as possible floor is a big thing for me, it only takes one minor trip to set off a chain reaction that will turn a good day bad. My back and knees aren't what they used to be so my rolling stool is essential and the wayward feet of subjects and assistant are unreliable in a darkened studio.

It's a wonderfully done set! She obviouly had fun modeling for the shots.

Thank you. We try to keep it fun. For every one good shot there's likely 3 or 4 of her acting silly or making faces.
 

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