Choice of camera: beginner

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by magnushasto, Feb 8, 2018.

  1. magnushasto

    magnushasto TPF Noob!

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    Im new to photographing and i wonder what camera i should choose as a starting camera. the price has to be around 750$. Im interested in nature photography, and are going to use it in bad weather. I also want a camera that is good to make films.


     
  2. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    Photographer skill and knowledge are very important for being able to consistently make quality images.
    Like understanding the importance of light direction/quality and how to compensate exposure when lighting conditions are likely to 'fool' a digital camera's light metering function.
    Digital Photography Tutorials

    Nature is a pretty broad genre of photography. To cover most aspects of nature photography would require not only a camera but several lenses too, from wide angle for close up shots of flowers to a long telephoto lens to make images of distant animals or small birds.

    Considerations for video would include use of an external microphone and having a decent set of tripod legs with a decent video fluid head.

    Nikon's D7000 series DSLR cameras would be worth a look as would Canon's equivalent DSLR cameras.
     
  3. espresso2x

    espresso2x No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    When you say nature, do you mean flowers and bugs or birds and beasts?
     
  4. ac12

    ac12 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    You need to be much more specific in what you plan to photograph.
    Nature can be 6 inches away or 6 miles away, and everything in between.
    Shoot a buy, or a flower, or a mountain, or a whale, or . . . .

    There is no 'weatherproof' camera and lens in your price range.
    You need to use some sort of a rain cover for the gear. Better yet, keep it out of the rain.
     
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  5. OldCam

    OldCam TPF Noob!

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    try for a kit, a nice body with a short zoomlens. that way you can decide later what kind of lens you want. i'm still happy with my 70mm kit lens as i also am a learner.
     
  6. magnushasto

    magnushasto TPF Noob!

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    I mean landscapes, mountains and animals so mostly objects thats not so close.
     
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  7. magnushasto

    magnushasto TPF Noob!

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    I want to shoot mostly pictures of objects that are not so close, but landscapes, mountains or animals.
     
  8. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Aperture - shutter speed - ISO

    Those are the three settings you've got that control photographic exposure in any camera on the market. So a top of the line DSLR is just as easy and just as hard to use as an entry level one; because those 3 core variables are still the very same.

    Of course high end come with more features and fancies; but that's all surrounding the very same core principles.


    I would say any entry level Canon or Nikon camera body would do well. Canon has a bit of an edge for wildlife in terms of the lenses they make in more affordable price ranges that are long - eg the Canon 400mm f5.6 L and the 100-400mm MII (higher price but high quality zoom ideal as generalist nature lens). They've also a unique lens in the MPE 65mm macro if you've an interest in VERY VERY tiny insects and nature.

    However by and large there is NOTHING one brand can do that the other can't. So either one will do you well and both have equal support from 3rd parties making a range of very good and high quality lenses now.



    Weather sealing is a feature you tend to get more on mid to top range camera bodies and lenses; the only manufacturer that really takes this to the limit is Pentax; though they've less 3rd party support and I'm honestly not sure of the lenses they've got in various price ranges.
    You can get a simple and effective OPTech Rainsleeve (2 in a pack) which will slip over any DSLR and lens and give you a very cheap and decent waterproof layer. There's also higher grade weather covers out there (higher grade generally means they can take more abuse without tearing). So even if the camera isn't 100% weathersealed you can still take decent and affordable steps to protect it.

    After that nikon generally has the edge at present with regard to sensor quality and noise control at higher ISO's so there's a real bias at present toward being being recommended to go with Nikon in that regard.
     
  9. Dave442

    Dave442 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    One interesting option is the Pentax K-3 with the 18-55mm kit lens. The camera is below your price point

    For landscape this body offers: pixel shift to increase resolution (not sure how good it is but sounds interesting), weather resistant body and lens (probably the only option at this price point), No Anti-Aliasing filter over the sensor (to allow more sharpness), has an optional GPS module available to tag photos. 100% frame coverage in the viewfinder (not available on most cameras at this price), Night vision setting so your eyes don't adjust while out doing those nighttime landscape shots.

    I used Pentax film cameras for landscape for many years, my brother had one of their early DSLR cameras that held up very well to backpacker travels.

    Another option is the Nikon D5600 to start out. This model falls just above their entry level camera, but offers some good features for someone starting out in photography. Start out with the 18-55mm AF-P kit lens, it will work fine for landscape, mountain scapes, and is easy to carry around all day taking pictures. This kit is right at your budget, they will add the 70-300mm AF-P for another $100 in the kit. Add a $10 Rain Sleeve to use in the rain.

    Used cameras are a good option, but it helps if you have some experience with cameras before jumping in and buying a used model. You might not know if the problems are operator or camera error.

    Remember to add memory cards, extra batteries (cold weather shortens the battery life), tripod (about $100 for the Manfrotto Compact Advanced is about as cheap as you want to use and you can easily spend more than what your camera cost), bag. So about $200 in extras.
     
  10. magnushasto

    magnushasto TPF Noob!

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    Thank you so much for the useful information!
     
  11. magnushasto

    magnushasto TPF Noob!

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    Thank you for good suggestions and information. Used cameras sound like a good idea.
     
  12. ac12

    ac12 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Geez it is like pulling teeth.
    Come on, get more specific.

    What kind of animals and how far.
    A deer at 200 ft, or moose at 12000 feet/400 yards.
     

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