Controlling light spill to get a very directional light

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by hamongnguyet, Jan 12, 2019.

  1. hamongnguyet

    hamongnguyet TPF Noob!

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    The photographer has controlled the spill / direction of light so well that the corridor walls don't show any trace of this light at all.

    Can a grid on softbox focussed from center and above the subject give me such lighting? I am getting my grid this weekend. However, wanted to know if grids can so beautifully control light spill or the photographer has just used photoshop to remove light spill on wall?


     
  2. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    You have no photograph to illustrate your post, but let me state this: a fabric grid on a softbox _can_ help a lot in controlling spill and direction of light on the areas located behind and to the sides of the area being lighted by the softbox. In the 1980's, when fabric grids and home-made grids were being introduced for softboxes, there was a sort of fad type of image in which a gridded softbox was used to create a "pool" of light on portrait subjects, while at the same time creating a very dark, gel-lighted background. By combining a gridded softbox, and a dark background paper with a colored gel over a flash unit being fired at the backdrop, it was fashionable to create a deep,saturated colored backdrop, and a well-lit person. In _normal_ studio lighting, using a softbox without a grid, there would normally be a tendency for the softbox to light-up the background quite a bit, and dilute the saturation of the gelled flash on the backdrop, and thus create a sort of washed-out,pastel-like backdrop.

    In the modern, 21-st century era, fabric grids that fit onto small, recessed-face softboxes Made in China have become VERY affordable, in the $49-$69 range at the low end of pricing; this is a fantastic trend! I kind of like the pair of 24-inch MIC boxes I bought a few years back. Came with grids. Assemble pretty fast.
     

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