Help Me Improve

Discussion in 'Nature & Wildlife' started by OldManJim, May 28, 2018.

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  1. OldManJim

    OldManJim No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    _JPM3207a.jpg So, I got a new lens (Tamron 150-600mm G2) and put it on my Nikon D7100. I took some shots of birds at the feeder the other day. They're not too bad for a first effort, but I'd like to do better. I'm looking for suggestions on what I need to improve.


     
    Last edited: May 28, 2018
  2. BrentC

    BrentC Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    First of all, in the first shot, you shot at f16. Way to high an aperture. For bird shots, unless there is something in the background you want in focus, shoot wide open. This will also bring your ISO down, less noise. The second shot is better in that regard, looks like you shot wide open. But exposure is off and your highlights are blown. Did you do some post processing on these? Your exposure looks off or you attempted to adjust it. How much did you crop these?

    If you want better feedback you need to specify the camera settings and what/if you did any post processing.
     
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  3. Fujidave

    Fujidave Blue eyed and Beautiful

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    Plus all you also need to do is, practice,practice and practice even more. That is what I did when I had the Sigma 150-600mm.
     
  4. birdbonkers84

    birdbonkers84 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I had the Nikon D7100 + Tamron 150-600 G1 combo for a while! For me, I used Aperture Priority, I found that with my version of the Tamron that f/8 was the sweet spot for decent sharpness at the longer end especially, every other time I would normally use f/6.3.

    Make sure you have high burst mode turned on (CH) on your D7100 and either single point or continuous auto focus selected depending on what you are photographing. I would then set my ISO to auto and set my minimum shutter speed depending on the subject/focal length i plan to use. i.e for birds in flight I would set it to 1/2000.

    I personally would look up Steve Perry's back button focusing tutorial on youtube, it's awesome.
     
  5. OldManJim

    OldManJim No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Thanks everyone for the great tips. I'll try them in the next day or so. I've been reading Steve Perry's book and got some great help there.

    On the images, I'm not sure why the first shot went to f16 - need to learn more about how to set up my camera!
     
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  6. birdbonkers84

    birdbonkers84 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    The Tamron 150-600 G2 is a fantastic lens, all the best with it, in some ways i'm jealous!
     
  7. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    The image appears to be 'overexposed'. I suggest you read up on exposure and metering. You can compensate for poor exposure in post ... but getting it right in the camera will make you a better photog. There is always a learning curve with a new lens. I also suggest you shoot, shoot again and at the end of the day when you think you're done, shoot some more.
     

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