Is it possible to pull the lightroom data from a jpeg online?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by UpperSpoon, Feb 9, 2018.

  1. UpperSpoon

    UpperSpoon TPF Noob!

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    Quick one, if I see a photo online that I really like, can I somehow get all the Lightroom data for it? like the f-stop, shutter speed, vibrance and clarity settings so on?

    Sorry if this is a stupid question.

    Cheers,
    Simon


     
  2. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    F-stop, shutter speed and other camera settings are Exif data that is part of the image file.
    There are may free Exif readers, but to help keep image files smaller many people make sure the Exif data is stripped from their image files before the files get posted online.

    Lightroom edits are XML line commands stored in an XMP file and aren't part of the image data that gets put online.
    An export option in Lightroom strips the Exif data from image files .
     
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  3. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Not stupid.

    Aperture and shutter speed are not Lightroom settings. Vibrance and clarity are, but you won't be able to get that data from an image posted online. The best way to find out is to communicate with the photographer and ask. Most photographers will happily tell you, but I don't know what you would do with that information.

    Lightroom adjustments depend on the condition of the original file and the photographer's intent in making adjustments. The finished image can be anything from straight out of the camera (SOOC) to something hardly recognizable as compared with the original photograph.

    If you are learning editing and would like to know what adjustments yield what effects, there are many online sources available to help you, some free, and some for a fee.
     
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  4. adamhiram

    adamhiram No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I have two websites I regularly use for looking at metadata in image files.

    Jeffrey Friedl's Image Metadata Viewer gives access to all embedded metadata included some fields you wouldn't see in Windows Explorer Properties/Details, or even within Lightroom. It's basically a big raw data dump though, so you'll have to know what you're looking for and what the numbers mean in some cases.
    Jeffrey Friedl's Image Metadata Viewer

    Pixel Peeper is a very interesting web application, in that it can actually show you the specific Lightroom edits made to an image file. The caveat is that it only shows the sliders and not local adjustments like spot healing or adjustment brush, won't show any additional post processing that may have been done in other applications like Photoshop, and of course the metadata has to be intact.
    Pixel Peeper – see how the photos you like were edited in Lightroom
     
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  5. dennybeall

    dennybeall No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I use a free copy of EXIF on my laptop.
    Good information for photographers - BIG PROBLEM THOUGH:
    Many cellphones, and some cameras, have GPS location turned on and that info is attached to the jpg photo. They take a photo of 2 YO Susy or their gold collection and post it. The exact location is in the data of the photo.......................
     
  6. astroNikon

    astroNikon 'ya all Bananas I tell 'ya Supporting Member

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    Keep in mind, depending upon where you are seeing an image that you want to see the EXIF on, some websites strip that information out when uploaded to it - such as Facebook.
     
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  7. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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  8. UpperSpoon

    UpperSpoon TPF Noob!

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    Thank you so much everyone for your replies.
    I probably should have mentioned my reason for asking is that I am practicing my food photography by looking at photos i like and trying to recreate them as closely as possible. its a fun exercise. So as you can imagine have some of the photo data would help my learning curve immensely.

    it sucks that for the most part the data will be stripped out, but I think some sources of my original images should still have data intact, I will look into some of those services.

    Thanks again.
    Si
     
  9. astroNikon

    astroNikon 'ya all Bananas I tell 'ya Supporting Member

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    using the EXIF may not provide much information.
    The "higher end" photos are probably using artificial light. And even the ones that are using natural light the exposure will be different based upon how much light they are getting through window(s), reflections, artificial ceiling lights, longer exposures, etc.

    It's best to look at how place items, and the angle/direction/location of the camera.

    For instance if you are too close to an image your aperture may be really small like f/22 to keep more of the depth of the object in focus which may introduce abberation and perspective distortion; whereas if you are further away at f/5.6 for the same depth of field (depth object in focus) the image quality (to the discerning eye) will be much better. Plus short shutter speed vs longer shutter speed (due to lower light with no artificial added light).

    Good luck. Best to post examples here as the pros can really help you improve everything.
     

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