Light Help For Jewelry

Discussion in 'Lighting and Hardware' started by ellenwheels, Mar 28, 2017.

  1. ellenwheels

    ellenwheels TPF Noob!

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    Hi,

    I use a small white nylon lightbox and a Nikon D3100. I'm having a horrible time getting decent pics of my jewelry and other handmade items for my Etsy shop. I'm very bad with the camera but I also know that the shop lights I'm using aren't helping so I'm tackling that first.

    From what I've been reading, the best results come from compact Fluorescent day light bulbs in a shop reflector. One article recommended 40 watt but that does not seem bright enough. Any recommendations on wattage, or other types of lighting?

    Thanks for any input.

    ETinLV


     
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The best results will come from doing this properly; ditching the light tent and getting strobed light. Pick up a copy of the lighting bible and read it. Then, read it again.
     
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  3. table1349

    table1349 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I would suggest getting this book instead. Okay, it's the same book, but it's the newest edition. :allteeth:
     
  4. smoke665

    smoke665 TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    It would also help if you posted an image. Knowing exactly what you're working with as to size, reflective surfaces, etc. would help others comment more specific.
     
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  5. astroNikon

    astroNikon 'ya all Bananas I tell 'ya Supporting Member

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    do not use compact Fluorescent lights.

    For product photography I'm actually leaning towards these type of bulbs ==> Amazon.com : Promaster LED Studio Lamp 50W/5600K E27 : Camera & Photo

    I haven't tried them but would give you continuous bright lighting, vs flourescents which was very dim and possibly flicker (that the camera can see) and the CFL light projection is not focused as they are designed to provide lighting all around.
     
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  6. ellenwheels

    ellenwheels TPF Noob!

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    [​IMG] FACTS Are Not A Liberal Conspiracy SCRABBLE Tile Pendant Necklace

    That's a link to one of my items, couldn't seem to just add the picture.

    I'm just looking for a simple solution. The photos just need to be able to show the item clearly with enough brightness and color. Not trying to make a mobile photography. Those bulbs are a tad pricey for me unfortunately.
     
  7. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    If the pictures are not bright enough, try using the camera's self-timer shutter release mode, and slowing the shutter down. At smaller f/stops like f/8 to f/13, slow shutter speeds like 1,2,3,4,5 seconds can create a nice exposure. Slooooooow speeds in the 2- to 5-second range can create very crisp, sharp photos as long as the camera is tripod-mounted, and is not jiggled in any way.

    If you can, post a photo or two as an example, and you might get better advice as to what the issue is with the current set-up you have.
     
  8. PhotoRob06

    PhotoRob06 TPF Noob!

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    Strobes are ideal, because you really have to crank the f-stop on macro shots if you want the entire piece in focus, and that takes lots of light.

    But it really depends on the angle and the depth of field you need. For selective focus jewelry shots, I've had great luck with north facing windows, and a small white card to bounce the light back.
     
  9. astroNikon

    astroNikon 'ya all Bananas I tell 'ya Supporting Member

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    then as Derrel mentions
    Slow down the shutter speed and use a smaller Aperture (larger number) to get more in focus in relation to Depth of Field based on your Aperture selection.
    strudy Tripod (not those $25 things).
    a remote release as your fingers can introduce shake to the camera
    and learn about White Balance ==> Understanding White Balance

    either way a good tripod and remote release is going to cost some, though not much money to get started.
     
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  10. smoke665

    smoke665 TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    First of all I'm assuming theses are JPEG, so reduce your image size to 1200 or less on a side. Save that image in a location you can find it. In the box here where you post replies click on the "upload file" button and follow the prompts.
     
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  11. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    I looked at the necklace/pendant. It appears to me that the lens is getting some flare from the light source, which is common with many lenses that do not have a good lens hood on them, or which tend to be flarey lenses (not all that uncommon actually). My suggestions: get a good lens shade/lens hood; shield the camera's lens front from bright sources of light that are close by it, using a small piece or cardboard or something like that; move the camwera back a bit and zoom in and see if the flare level goes down; re-position the lights a bit, or block extra light from the lights themselves, so stray light does not "hit the lens in the eyeball".

    Holding a piece of black-painted cardboard between trhe lens and the light source, and literally casting a shadow onto the frotn of the lens fron element, can be helpful in these types of situations. In professional commerical shooting a compendium lens hood can be used to get the absolute best lens performance in this kind of lighting situation.

    Again--MANY lenses flare easily when bright light sources are near the front element, or when bright light rakes in at an angle toward the front element. Just as we like sunglasses when driving toward the low sun in the sky, lenses can suffer too.
     
  12. table1349

    table1349 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Dude, you have got to knock off those two joint lunch breaks. Your spelling goes to "pot" after the second joint. :allteeth:

    Good advice though.
     
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