Necessary equiptment for start up buisness...

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by mel02monroe, Jun 21, 2006.

  1. FuddyDuddy

    FuddyDuddy TPF Noob!

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    Hello,

    Bill, you're gonna fit in just fine here! :lmao:

    Fuddy


     
  2. Philip Weir

    Philip Weir TPF Noob!

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    Hi "Mel02monroe" I think I have offended you with my reply, I obviously misunderstood what you were getting and I apologise. I suppose we base our answers on our background and experience and I am not a wedding photographer, but I have been in business for 38 years in advertising photography, and spent the previous 10 years working in the industry to learn my trade. I will now follow "wigwam jones" and bow out of the discussion.
     
  3. mel02monroe

    mel02monroe TPF Noob!

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    THanks for the reply, the list isn't too far from what I had in mind. Thanks for the suggestions too!
     
  4. jwkwd

    jwkwd TPF Noob!

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    So anyhow, the letters at the end, pretty much are the type of coatings on the lens. I don't have anything digital, but, don't " G " lenses come without an aperature control ring ?
     
  5. ted_smith

    ted_smith TPF Noob!

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    To answer a point from the original question that has not been answered, you don't need to pay for an expensive copy of PhotoShop. Just use the open-source equivalent - the GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program). See www.gimp.org. It's as good as Photoshop (some say better) and you can use it legally with your business for free.

    Ted
     
  6. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    If I were to cross into the high risk world of wedding photography the first thing I would do.... find another photographer to apprentice under. You sound young and haven't accumulated financial/family obligations and responsibility. If you are serious, offer your services for free for the sake of learning. Just like any trade, you cannot just jump in head first.
     
  7. JIP

    JIP No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    This question comes up here all the time and I know it's sometimes met with the nicest responses but I think a little explanation is in order. The people here who might get offended by this type of question are people who (like myself) have spent years learning a craft (Photography) done countless low paid weddings and mabye someday (or now) will be getting paid good money to shoot portraits weddings etc. because they have the experience and have paid their dues. Now I'm not saying you need to apprentice under someone for years or whatever but do not be surprised when you come on here and say "I'm not sure what side to look into the camera but I want to get a SBA loan and open a studio where do I start" (of course an extreme exxageration) and you get a bad reaction.
     
  8. Chris SWF

    Chris SWF TPF Noob!

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    Hi Mel,
    There are some really good points and advice from people here and understandably some frustrations when it appears like a typical 'I have just bought a low end DSLR and kit lens and am setting up a wedding business'. It looks like you have your head screwed on and are planning well. The advice to build up slowly and reinvest is very good as there is always something else you need. I'm sure the other working photographers will agree with me that it is only when you are actually working that you find your style and therefore which kit you like. For instance, my colleague has completely different kit to me (both Canon) but we both work in the same business. Just as some suggestions for kit which I would say vary from essential to desirable are ... fast lenses for low light non flash services (I carry a couple on me) spare camera body (again I have it on me) flashes and remote transmitter (as direct flash as main source is point and shoot territory) Insurance (professional indemnity, public liability and equipment) Radio Triggers (as sync leads are unreliable and dangerous) etc etc Hope this helps, cheers Chris
     
  9. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I will just input that Nikon AF lenses need to be set at the minimum aperature for automatic camera modes to work. If you don't you get the EE message. So if your lens has a minimum aperature of 32. Then you have to set it to that for the camera to control the aperature (auto). Most lenses actually have a lock there so you can't accidentially take it out of the minimum aperature. Even though its on 32, that doesn't mean what the camera is adjusting it too. The camera opens the lens wide open so you have a bright view. When you take the picture it stops down to the setting the metering determines is correct (auto mode).

    Now for the camera. I disagree that you automaticially have to have a big mp camera to do wedding / portrait work. Now if you have a smaller mp camera it may limit your customers. But part of taking a job is for the photographer to interview the client. To know what the client wants and expects! They interview you, and you them. If they want large prints, then yes, you may have to trun the job down. If they want a standard photo album with no bigger than 8x10's. Then the lower D-70 camera will be just fine. But I will caution the need for fast lenses. If you have cheap slow lenses (lower quality glass also). You may find your output prints are not of high enough quality. Cameras too, but in this discussion its a known good camera.
     
  10. wickerby

    wickerby TPF Noob!

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    Someone earlier suggested a few props for children, benches, chairs, etc. You can find high quality and custom designed chairs, benches and posers in wicker, willow, wood or metal at http://www.wickerbydesign.com . We have sizes for all ages of children, infants, babies, toddlers, 3-5 years old and older children - even Seniors. You can also search for posing ideas in our Portrait Gallery where there are nearly 1000 images with search tags.
     
  11. digital flower

    digital flower No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I guess you are getting a little taste of what business is going to be like on this thread. Personally I applaud your planning before you actually start. As a person who went into business without much of a plan (not wedding photography) I can attest that it is not an easy way to go. I struggled for several years because of poor planning and not being knowledgeable about certain things. I was lucky and now have become successful and secure enough not to worry about anyone else and what they are doing (in my business anyone with a pickup truck and sign on the side is ‘in the business’). You will always run into naysayers and people that don’t think you should try it. If being a wedding photographer is your dream, don’t listen to them, just continue your education and getting experience and try and follow your idea as far as you can. The market will ultimately decide if you should be there or not. Here is my short list of things you need to be successful:

    1. Knowledge and experience
    2. Honesty and integrity (reputation is paramount)
    3. Drive and the ability to challenge yourself and take advantage of opportunities that are presented
    4. Networking (it’s about people)

    I am surprised by some people’s reaction here. It is not the TPF I have come to know and love. So my advice is hang out, keep reading and asking questions as there are some extremely knowledgable and talented people that will help you (some have replied to this thread already), not put you down.
     
  12. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    For the OP. Your aperture ring is locked at minimum aperture so that the camera can control exposure automatically. Aperture is controled through the camera in your case, not through the aperture ring. You can unlock it if you like and use it on a camera that doesn't require a locked aperture ring to function. You are nowhere near ready to be professional photographer. Sorry. Why not keep your day job and spend a few years getting your feet wet?

    It's good to ask questions and good to learn but, like the others, I think you should do more of that before trying to get paid for doing photography.

    At this point I will also bow out.
     

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