please give me suggestions

colorful

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I am starting on taking photos for my daughter.

Need suggestions on how to improve my skill.

Thanks very much.
mmexport1499838046226.jpg
mmexport1499838038460.jpg
 

480sparky

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My first impression is the backgrounds are too cluttered. Clutter = distraction. And as cute as she is, the clutter draws the viewer's eye away from her.

The shutter speed on the second one seems a bit too long. Bump the ISO up a couple stops and shorten the shutter speed to keep her movement from causing blurring.

The lighting on the second one is outstanding, though.
 
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colorful

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My first impression is the backgrounds are too cluttered. Clutter = distraction. And as cute as she is, the clutter draws the viewer's eye away from her.

The shutter speed on the second one seems a bit too long. Bump the ISO up a couple stops and shorten the shutter speed to keep her movement from causing blurring.

The lighting on the second one is outstanding, though.
Thank you very much:)
 

Derrel

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Improving your skill? SHoot more photos, every single day. Get low with the camera. EXPLORE different lens lengths: 20mm, 24mm, 28mm, 50mm, 85mm, 200mm. Learn to use fill-in or bounce flash. Keep working on framing and timing. Realize that kid pictures are not easy to make! You need to constantly work on getting and keeping good backgrounds, well-appointed scenes, keeping the cmera sert to the correct or optimal settings, and work on your split-second shutter release timing.
 
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colorful

colorful

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Improving your skill? SHoot more photos, every single day. Get low with the camera. EXPLORE different lens lengths: 20mm, 24mm, 28mm, 50mm, 85mm, 200mm. Learn to use fill-in or bounce flash. Keep working on framing and timing. Realize that kid pictures are not easy to make! You need to constantly work on getting and keeping good backgrounds, well-appointed scenes, keeping the cmera sert to the correct or optimal settings, and work on your split-second shutter release timing.
Yes you are every right. Keep working hard is always the best way to go and I am implementing those in your suggestion. I am taking photos and reading books every day.

I hope some one can tell me what is wrong in my picture. I need an idea or a clue so I know where to go and how to get there.

Thanks for your comments to me.
 

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My number one tip mirrors Sparky's, i.e., to avoid cluttered backgrounds.
Derrel and Sparky have given enough good advice and tips for you to be working on for now.

You've got a good start, especially with #2. Your daughter is a lovely subject and doesn't seem to be camera shy. I look forward to seeing your progress. :)
 

Peeb

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I agree with the thoughts expressed already.

1. Point of view- make sure that your angles are flattering and/or interesting. With kid or pet pictures, standing over your subject and looking down is not likely to yield the image you are after.

2. Background. Watch for clutter. As the photographer, you are responsible for every square inch of your frame. Some thing can be 'cropped out' later, but some things should just be avoided altogther. In addition, look for interesting or attractive backgrounds. This might be in the form of shapes, colors, nature, use your imagination.

3. Understand the exposure triangle. Every image contains a choice of the three primary variables of an exposure:
  • shutter speed
  • aperture setting
  • ISO
varying these parameters can have a profound effect on your ability to craft your precise image. Whether you want to freeze or blur motion, catch the background in focus or blur it out- there are ways to accomplish this. Learn them.
4. Think about light. This might seem obvious, but photography is all about light. Whether you are using natural light, interior lighting, an on-camera flash, or other lighting rigs, the quality and style of your image depends upon light. Shooting outdoors in the early morning or at sunset can yield entirely different tones and looks than indoors, or outside at noon. Also, the positioning of the light is key. For example: do you want a silhouette? Get the light behind your subject. Do you want to avoid silhouetting your subject but the light is necessarily behind your subject- use a fill flash. Learn about light.
 
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colorful

colorful

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My number one tip mirrors Sparky's, i.e., to avoid cluttered backgrounds.
Derrel and Sparky have given enough good advice and tips for you to be working on for now.

You've got a good start, especially with #2. Your daughter is a lovely subject and doesn't seem to be camera shy. I look forward to seeing your progress. :)

Thank you for your advice and encouragement.
 
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colorful

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I agree with the thoughts expressed already.

1. Point of view- make sure that your angles are flattering and/or interesting. With kid or pet pictures, standing over your subject and looking down is not likely to yield the image you are after.

2. Background. Watch for clutter. As the photographer, you are responsible for every square inch of your frame. Some thing can be 'cropped out' later, but some things should just be avoided altogther. In addition, look for interesting or attractive backgrounds. This might be in the form of shapes, colors, nature, use your imagination.

3. Understand the exposure triangle. Every image contains a choice of the three primary variables of an exposure:
  • shutter speed
  • aperture setting
  • ISO
varying these parameters can have a profound effect on your ability to craft your precise image. Whether you want to freeze or blur motion, catch the background in focus or blur it out- there are ways to accomplish this. Learn them.
4. Think about light. This might seem obvious, but photography is all about light. Whether you are using natural light, interior lighting, an on-camera flash, or other lighting rigs, the quality and style of your image depends upon light. Shooting outdoors in the early morning or at sunset can yield entirely different tones and looks than indoors, or outside at noon. Also, the positioning of the light is key. For example: do you want a silhouette? Get the light behind your subject. Do you want to avoid silhouetting your subject but the light is necessarily behind your subject- use a fill flash. Learn about light.

Thank you very much. I will practice on these.
 

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