Program mode vs. Full Automatic

Peeb

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I understand that in BOTH modes, the camera selects the exposure variables, and you just press the shutter to capture the image.

Is the primary difference that on program mode, you can adjust these suggested settings whereas on auto, it is what it is?

Is the answer the same for all makes and models (currently shooting Nikon, btw if it matters).
 
I don't think my Canon will shoot Raw in auto mode. Not sure if the newer ones do tbh.
 
Oh, and I think the flash will pop up if needed in Auto mode, in P mode you must manually lift it iirc.
 
I understand that in BOTH modes, the camera selects the exposure variables, and you just press the shutter to capture the image.

Is the primary difference that on program mode, you can adjust these suggested settings whereas on auto, it is what it is?

Is the answer the same for all makes and models (currently shooting Nikon, btw if it matters).


Read your owner's manual. Most often "P" mode is at the front of the manual section labeled "Creative Modes". Or, as one manual puts it; "More discerning shots, in your preferred shooting style".

In each of the automatic modes, the camera is selecting every value relevant to the end result based on presets created by the designer/manufacturer. Your job is simply to point the lens at something interesting. The metering and focusing systems of the camera then read the overall scene and make corrections based on the assumed "best result" which was assumed on a designer's bench long before you ever purchased the camera. For this reason, most fully automatic shots, whether they turn out the way you had hoped or not, have a very similar appearance one to the next to the next. Sort of like going into a big box retailer, they are all laid out in a similar fashion to provide a sense of sameness to the buyer. You know men's wear will be here and electronics will be there and so on. Or, more appropriately, like eating a fast food meal which you know from prior experience will be like every other meal purchased from that chain. You will not find anything truly unique about the results of either McDonalds or a camera left in full auto mode. However, if at times your idea of creativity is pickles or no pickles, then full auto mode may suit you.

Moving away from full automatic modes to even the simplest of the manual selection modes, the "P" mode, allows you to begin making decisions regarding just how the image might appear. How much control you wish to exert is controlled by which "creative" mode you select. Aperture and shutter priorities allow you, as the photographer, more control over how specific scenes will appear. P mode is still largely an "if this, then that" shooting mode as far as the manner in which the camera's electronics operate but you can at least select the "this". Now you can select pickles but no mustard or mayonaise and extra onions.

You can select multiple values individually in P mode including metering and exposure locks which will provide a less generic look to your photos. These are the most basic functions which determine proper exposure and over look to your photos. Since you select one value and the camera responds but selecting an equivalent value, the camera begins to do as you wish. If you prefer to change the metering of the scene to create an effect, you will not be able to do so in full auto mode (where the camera is in full control of the results) and you'll need to learn how P mode - at the very least - sees things and responds to scenes.

While there's nothing wrong with using fully automatic modes at times, your creative input can only be added in the other than fully auto modes. Certainly, if you have a camera with more sophistication, then learning how to control it vs allowing it to control you will ultimately provide the more sophisticated look of a higher quality image.
 
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I don't think my Canon will shoot Raw in auto mode. Not sure if the newer ones do tbh.
I am not sure my D750 will shoot in AUTO mode or JPEG for that matter, once my selector went through it and a voice from the camera said ARE YOU KIDDING ME ?
I also tried to shoot JPEG, there was a hysterical laughter coming from deep inside the camera but it remained in RAW.

Hmmmmm weird camera :boggled:
Did any other D750 owner experienced same problem ?
 
Program is a step up from Auto and attempts to give you some creative control. This is because for each metered scene there are a set of values of aperture and shutterspeed (assuming constant ISO) which can be selected - I think the number is around 8 or so different combinations (if you include changeable ISO its even more).

This means you can have some control; whilst the camera is still "doing all the work" as such.



Personally I've never used it. I used auto back when I started and then shifted right into aperture priority mode - I never really saw a need for program myself since I wanted to take control over the camera. The meter can also be fooled and thus even with program it can render an exposure that is not what you want - again where manual mode or even the priority modes with exposure compensation, let you have an easier time controling the camera.
 
Program is a step up from Auto and attempts to give you some creative control. This is because for each metered scene there are a set of values of aperture and shutterspeed (assuming constant ISO) which can be selected - I think the number is around 8 or so different combinations (if you include changeable ISO its even more).

This means you can have some control; whilst the camera is still "doing all the work" as such.



Personally I've never used it. I used auto back when I started and then shifted right into aperture priority mode - I never really saw a need for program myself since I wanted to take control over the camera. The meter can also be fooled and thus even with program it can render an exposure that is not what you want - again where manual mode or even the priority modes with exposure compensation, let you have an easier time controling the camera.
When I started out- neither automatic nor program modes existed. My canonet GIII rangefinder was shutter priority or manual only. I hold that bias for shutter priority to this day only by virtue of habit. For purposes of DOF and other reasons, aperture priority is pretty handy!
 
I understand that in BOTH modes, the camera selects the exposure variables, and you just press the shutter to capture the image.

Is the primary difference that on program mode, you can adjust these suggested settings whereas on auto, it is what it is?

Is the answer the same for all makes and models (currently shooting Nikon, btw if it matters).

Pretty much yes, and yes.

Auto mode is fully auto, including auto exposure, Auto ISO, Auto White Balance, Auto color profiles, auto flash popup. About all we can control is where we aim it and when we push the shutter button.

Mode P is auto exposure, but nothing else. If you want the other Auto options, you can turn them on, but you can also turn them off.
 

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