Question about Rollei 6x7CXL

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by Luna44, Jan 15, 2018.

  1. Luna44

    Luna44 TPF Noob!

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    I was online reading various postings. Saw one that states that the Rollie 6x7 CXL and Omega LPL 670MXL are the same enlarger and can take or use the same equipment? Is this true? I have a Rollie. I am looking for a 4x5 negative carrier. Omega supplies are much easier to find then Rollei. Any thoughts.


     
  2. compur

    compur Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    You can't print a 4x5 negative with any 6x7 enlarger so there are no 4x5 neg carriers for any of them.

    "4x5" means 4x5 inches
    "6x7" means 6x7 centimeters or roughly 2¼ x 2¾ inches which is the largest neg that can be used

    To enlarge 4x5 negs you need a 4x5 (or larger) enlarger such as an Omega D-series or Beseler 45-series, etc

    Or, you can contact print them using no enlarger at all.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2018
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  3. Luna44

    Luna44 TPF Noob!

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    As my post makes clear I am very new to the world of medium format and all it's in and outs. I have been gifted a LPL 6x7 670MLX and I am looking for supplies. I have never shot with 120 film and don't know the various sizes of the possible negatives. I don't mean to come off as a total moron. Thank you for the clarification. so there is a 6x7 cm . Is there also a 6x6 cm size? slightly smaller? This is my confusion. I thought 120 film produced negatives that are 6 x6 in size? So you would need a negative carrier that was 6x6?
     
  4. Luna44

    Luna44 TPF Noob!

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    Ok so I am learning. Disregard the part about the 4x5 carrier. I have learned this doesn't apply. Does anyone know about the first part of my question- about Rollei and LPL being essentially the same product just with two brand names?
     
  5. pendennis

    pendennis No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Generally, medium format comes in three different dimensions -

    • 6x6 - Translates to 2.25"x2.25". Hasselblad and twin lens reflexes are but two examples.
    • 6x7 - Translates to 2.25"x2.75". The Mamiya RB67 and RZ67 are the two most noted examples.
    • 6x4.5 - Translates to 2.25"x1.625". The Mamiya M645 and its iterations is a very popular camera.

    There are also other medium format sizes, such as 6x17, 6x9, 6x8. Those are fairly specialized and rare among the format. There are also specialized backs for using medium format film on large format cameras. There used to be 220 film which was 120 film with twice the number of frames, except no paper backing. There are still a number of makes of medium format in color print, B&W, and color transparencies (Kodak, Fuji, Ilford). Medium format still has a nice following, and a lot of photographers develop and print. However, I'm one of those who shoots medium format, and I scan it to digital.

    A lot of the existing medium format equipment is used, and you can get it fairly inexpensively.

    It's generally unadviseable to try and get double usage of negative carriers. Each size is made specifically to hold the film flat.
     
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  6. compur

    compur Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I know that some LPL enlargers were also branded as Rollei but I don't know if the exact models you mention are the same between the two.
     

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