Setup for simple apparel photography

Discussion in 'Lighting and Hardware' started by annab531, Jan 26, 2016.

  1. annab531

    annab531 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I have a online clothing boutique and I need a simple & cheap way to photograph my inventory. What's the easiest away to achieve results like the image below? As of right now I'm going to just be taking pictures of the clothes on hangers, not on mannequins or people. I have a white backdrop perpendicular to a window but there's not that much natural light.

    Please don't post images to which you do not hold rights. You may post a link.


     
  2. annab531

    annab531 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    • Like Like x 1
  3. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    45,748
    Likes Received:
    14,782
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Window light can be very pleasing, but it's not reliable. If you want to be able to this at your pleasure, and not Mother Nature's you need to either get the gear, or get someone who has the gear. The simplest way is to hire a professional. "Cheap" depends on your budget. For simple clothing on hangar/mannequin shots, $3-400 should get you three Yongnuo or equivalent manual speedlights, a couple of 32" reflecting umbrellas, light stands and triggers. First and foremost however, you need to buy and read, and the re-read the Lighting Bible!
     
  4. Ihatemymoney

    Ihatemymoney No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2013
    Messages:
    173
    Likes Received:
    25
    Location:
    nevada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit

    Hi Anna
    Your making everyone guess on what Cheap is to you.
    Personally I wanted cheap and I lived in the big city I would be checking second hand stores and Craig's list and the wanted for sale sections of photography forms.

    I like Flash or strobe's and rather never want to mess around with florescent lighting...

    But if you set your custom white balance I am sure you can get away with florescent lighting....

    You do know that the cheap lighting stuff makes junk look good.
    My Cowboy continuous florescent lighting studio kit broke from the moment I took it out of the box.....
    The Cowboy lights stands cant hold the weight of the light and the shot boxes.
    And straight up I would never want to have to put the Cowboy soft boxes together ,more then once in my life.....

    Part of my point is do you have the room to leave the lights up, or are you tearing down everytime you are done...

    If you need a lighting system that can be put up and torn down simple and easy that cost money.
    And I have a issue with putting a expensive strobe up on some POS light stand that can fall over at anytime.
    part of what you need to be buying is equipment that actually works and isn't a safety issue.

    So without knowing your budget I have no idea how to advise you on what lighting meets your budget.

    Your first investment sold be in reading a book or two on lighting.

    Light Science and Magic and Speed lighters hand book are both good books or must have books.









    .
     
  5. nf1

    nf1 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2016
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    26
    Location:
    Toronto, ON, Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit


    Getting to know photography deeper is certainly the way to go. You can look at photography courses in your area as well. Regarding the light setup for the product you linked - it will be very difficult to achieve this with just window light - the one reason for this is that the light will be coming at an angle and will be changing constantly. For product shots you want to have repetitive results.
    Here's what you need in my view:
    This is a 1 light setup, so think 1 flash light with a light modifier (any umbrella or softbox will work). You will also need radio trigger to power the flash off-camera and a light stand with umbrella holder/adapter.
    Hang the clothes on a white wall/background, set you camera at your x-sync speed (or 1/125 - 1/200 sec if unsure). Use f8 aperture and ISO 100. Then experiment with the power of the flash - start at 1/4 and go up or down from there.
    Regarding light setup - position the flash directly at the clothes.
    Final step - you'll probably need to do some basic post-processing light adjusting levels.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

photography setup forum