Shooting landscapes in the day

sam_justice

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Is it worth it?
It seems the best landscape photography comes when either the sun is rising/setting or extreme weather is on the way. Shooting landscape just on a normal sunny day seems to pump out some boring shots.
 
You're pretty much bang on the money. A few certain scenes look good during the day, like a tropical island for instance. Morning or evening light is just much more dramatic in most situations.
 
If you find you have time and want to shoot, go out and look for areas of interest where the sun is not blowing out the details. Tree trunks, rocks, water, flowers, leaves, cliffs, people on the trail, etc... There is always opportunity, but opportunity does not knock on the door, you need to seek it out.
 
You can get some decent shots midday but usually the best shots are when the is is going up or down. Shadows are not as harsh and you get better colors all around. It really just depends on where your at and what your shooting. I enjoy a area called Palaski trail, it's a historical spot here in Idaho but is very narrow with the mountins all around so I usually wait a bit longer so I have some light for that spot than say if I am shooting down by the lake. Then again there are exceptions so like I said it all depends.
 
if you have some cover with trees or clouds so the lighting isn't harsh you can get some really good shots
 
There's always something to see -- all day long. It's up to the photographer to see it.

Joe
 
Is it worth it?
It seems the best landscape photography comes when either the sun is rising/setting or extreme weather is on the way. Shooting landscape just on a normal sunny day seems to pump out some boring shots.
The 'best' landscape photography occurs when the photographer sees a large tonal range and good contrast in the landscape, and that can happen at any time, and, of course, during the morning and evening hours.
 
It depends on what you're shooting and where the sun is, but the old rule of not shooting outside between 10 and 2 is a good rule to follow. This time of year in Arizona, I stop shooting at 9 am because the light is just too flat.

Have Fun,
Jeff
 
I gave it a try today around 1:15pm, see if this helps

Woods2.jpg
 
It depends on what you're shooting and where the sun is, but the old rule of not shooting outside between 10 and 2 is a good rule to follow. This time of year in Arizona, I stop shooting at 9 am because the light is just too flat.

Have Fun,
Jeff

Just at 9 o'clock you need to head over to Oak Creek canyon. Used to be good for mid dayight.
 
It depends on what you're shooting and where the sun is, but the old rule of not shooting outside between 10 and 2 is a good rule to follow. This time of year in Arizona, I stop shooting at 9 am because the light is just too flat.

Have Fun,
Jeff
same here, plus I start to melt and sweat like Jenna Jamison in a church.
 
afternoons are good for scouting sites for later - even days or weeks later. Look for the right spots, look for ways to get the best composition, including foreground/background, etc, then figure out when/where best sunrise or sunset spots will be. That way, when you do have the time, you make a beeline for that spot and you'll already have an idea of what you want!

I've done this in several spots in a few states in my area, and am about to go back to these spots and HOPEFULLY not only improve on my previous shots, but get those golden sunsets, as I'm not much of an early riser!
 

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