State of the Art in Color Print Films

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by OldManJim, Apr 4, 2019.

  1. OldManJim

    OldManJim No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 25, 2017
    Messages:
    325
    Likes Received:
    125
    Location:
    Newark, DE
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Hi:

    I've been out of the film game for about 15 years. Recently, I've been working with B&W films, Ilford HP5+ and Ultrafine 400 mostly.

    Now, I'd like to try some color print films. I'm interested in your thoughts on the best fine grain film (i.e. Velvia 50 like - although I know that's a slide film) and a fast color film (i.e. Delta 3200 like).

    I know I could go out and buy a bunch of films but it seemed like it would be faster to ask here - not to mention avoiding the lengthy explanations to my wife about why I spent so much money.

    Not trying to start a war here, just interested in learning what's currently available. I could shoot 35mm or 120, but I'd prefer 120 for the larger negatives.


     
  2. webestang64

    webestang64 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    May 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,471
    Likes Received:
    715
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO. USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Kodak Ektar 100 for fine grain and Fuji 400 for low light, of course I shoot it all conditions. Fuji 400 is my favorite color print film. I've pushed it to 1600 with great results.

    Fuji 400 rated at 320 ISO.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. cgw

    cgw No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2013
    Messages:
    1,634
    Likes Received:
    360
    Location:
    Toronto
    With respect, I'd first scope out labs in your area that still have busy C-41 processing lines. Go for mail order if local resources are lousy or absent. Crappy developing--and even worse scanning and printing--have never been easier to find. The consumer Fujifilm and Kodak materials are all reliable and affordable in 35mm. Kodak Ektar and Portra 160/400/800 are all 120 winners.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  4. Dave Colangelo

    Dave Colangelo No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2016
    Messages:
    440
    Likes Received:
    149
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    For color work I shoot Fuji Velvia 50 almost exclusively at this point. I like the colors, the fine grain and the look. I have shot (and still sometimes do shoot) plenty of Kodak but its just not the same. As others have said you will need to find our mail out to a good E-6 lab. If you are really serious about it all you may want to consider buying a scanner they are not terribly expensive these days and may balance out in the long run. If you have lots of old negatives you can use it to digitize them as well.
     
  5. AlanKlein

    AlanKlein No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2011
    Messages:
    1,222
    Likes Received:
    404
    Location:
    NJ formerly NYC
    I like shooting Velvia 50 in 120 format. I find it's easier to scan than print films and you know immediately if the shot was exposed correctly, unlike with print film. Although I use a meter and shoot from a tripod, I still bracket my shots. Good luck on whatever you decide to use. Have fun. Shoot your wife and then give her a blown up framed photo of it. If you have kids, do that too. Your wife won't ask what it cost.
    Search: velvia | Flickr
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. Dave Colangelo

    Dave Colangelo No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2016
    Messages:
    440
    Likes Received:
    149
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Be careful, crime scene photography is tough. :biggrin-new:
     
  7. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    43,767
    Likes Received:
    16,661
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Ektar 100 is amazingly fine-grained. In 120, 6x6 negs shot on Ektar 100 are amazingly detailed! I have shot mostly Ektachrome 64 and Ektachrome 100, and the very old VPS (replaced by Portra many years ago, as well as Portra NC 160 mostly, but Ektar 100 is finer-grained, and simply amazing. Portra NC scans well, and has lower contrast than "consumer" or "prosumer" film stocks.

    I think you ought to buy a few rolls of several films, and SEE for yourself, with your lab,and your shooting methods, what _you_ like.

    "Opinions are like @##%)L%&...everybody has one."
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2019
  8. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    43,767
    Likes Received:
    16,661
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I prefer slide film for a lot of uses...
     
  9. OldManJim

    OldManJim No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 25, 2017
    Messages:
    325
    Likes Received:
    125
    Location:
    Newark, DE
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    times

    My local lab seems pretty good; they are used by a number of pros in the area that shoot film. I've shot a Macbeth color chart, sent the film to them and compared the results. They were quite good.

    Thanks again for your suggestions.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. bhop

    bhop No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2007
    Messages:
    2,294
    Likes Received:
    310
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit


    IMO, Ektar 100 is the best for fine grain negative film.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2

Share This Page