Sunset at a Harbor

Joel_W

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Went to a local harbor to capture the setting sun on what turned out to be a nearly perfect winter's day. I always bracket my sunset pictures +1,0,-1, and since I've started experimenting with HDR images, find myself nearly always prefering the HDR image of the combined picture, over anything that I can produce from a single picture. This I'm sure is the result of the fact that I'm shooting in JPEG, since my present camera doesn't shoot in RAW, so I'm limited to what I can accomplish in Post Production Editing.

Here's a few pictures from that shoot. CC's are more then welcome.


Mount Sinai Harbor4 by jaw101, on Flickr


Mount Sinai Harbor6 by jaw101, on Flickr


Mount Sinai Harbor2 by jaw101, on Flickr


Mount Sinai Harbor1 by jaw101, on Flickr
 
Generally a landscape photo looks better on a wider crop ratio. Maybe 2:1 ratio. I even use 3:1 when I stitch several images together.
 
Generally a landscape photo looks better on a wider crop ratio. Maybe 2:1 ratio. I even use 3:1 when I stitch several images together.

Thanks. I'll try and play with them and see if what I gets actually looks better.
 
Yeah, your camera even takes narrower photo. A typical DSLR is 3:2 ratio and I still think it is not wide enough. Your camera is 4:3. So personally I would throw away some pixels on the top and/or bottom.
 
I never realized that. Right now I'm shooting with a Nikon Coolpix P500. Planning on getting a refurb'd D5000 or D5100 body, 18-70mm, & a 90mm macro in the next few months. The P500 will be dedicated to just telephoto opportunities at this point. I put it up for sale for $250, but haven't gotten an serious takers.

I started to play around with an aspect ratio of 3:2, and I much prefer how most of my scenics look. Some that have dramatic cloud/skies and little foreground, are really tough to edit. I would think that I have to keep this issue in mind when I'm actually taking the picture, but there is already so much I try to think about as it is. Here is just one example.

original @ 4:3

Mount Sinai Harbor 8 by jaw101, on Flickr

cropped to 3:2

Mount Sinai Harbor 8copy by jaw101, on Flickr
 
Yup, those wider shots are more fitting. Not fond of the placement of the sun, though, in #2.
 
Yup, those wider shots are more fitting. Not fond of the placement of the sun, though, in #2.

Point well taken. I'll have to be more conscience of where the setting sun actually ends up. I was really focused on the reflections on the rocks in the foreground.
 
As for composition, a beach should be appealing in some way. In your second shot what I see is some place I dont want to put my feet on. Not a very good looking spot. It takes my attention away from the sunset as I can only think of moving on.
 
As for composition, a beach should be appealing in some way. In your second shot what I see is some place I dont want to put my feet on. Not a very good looking spot. It takes my attention away from the sunset as I can only think of moving on.

Brynx, I'd agree with you if it was a beach, but it's not. It's the Mount Sinai harbor at low tide. The thread title Says Mount Sinai Harbor, each picture is clearly labeled the same. So I see no positive point in your comments, nor why you even brought it up. Thanks anyway for your input.
 
Whether its a beach or harbor, the point is its not very eye appealing. So while you may see no positive points in my comment, I see no positive appeal to your image. I guess Id sooner see something that looks nice as opposed to seeing something yucky.
 
Whether its a beach or harbor, the point is its not very eye appealing. So while you may see no positive points in my comment, I see no positive appeal to your image. I guess Id sooner see something that looks nice as opposed to seeing something yucky.

Whatever. You called it a beach, and said you rather not put your feet on it. I just corrected your statement that's all. If it's not appealing to you, that's fine too. I've been around those harbors both as a fisherman and boater for more years then I care to remember. To me, it's a natural state I've see that harbor in all the time.
 
For a guy hanging around the harbor so much you dont seem to know what is what. The harbor is the water part, the beach is the sandy, pebbly part. I made reference to the latter while you are talking about the former. Whatever. Gorgeous sky in the first pic.
 
For a guy hanging around the harbor so much you dont seem to know what is what. The harbor is the water part, the beach is the sandy, pebbly part. I made reference to the latter while you are talking about the former. Whatever. Gorgeous sky in the first pic.

Bynx. Yes an no. Please just read what I'm saying with an open mind as I'll try to explain where I am. What you're referring to is the bottom of the shoreline of the harbor at low tide. It's not a beach, and people aren't allowed to use it as such during low tide. Look down the beach and you'll see the masks of all the sailboats on dry land for winter storage. Behind where I was photographing, which therefore isn't in the pictures, are the moorings, ramps, and town ramp for trailered boats. To the right in the picture you can just make out Shore Drive. Across that road is in fact Cedar Beach. It's located on the north shore of Long Island along the southern portion of Long Island sound.

Since you live in toronto, you might not be that familiar with tidal waters, and the degree in fluctuation of the water level between high and low tides. It can easily be more then 3-4 ft depending where on the Island you are. That area we're discussing is completely covered during high tide. You can see the natural waterline where the sand/pebbles meets the grassy areas.

Thank you for your positive comment about my sunset. I'll try in the future to be more respectful and understanding of those that don't live near to water accesses like I do.
 

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