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lemonart

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Hey all.

I'm interested in learning more about my camera (D7000) and any future cameras I may consider. I'd really like to get to know the real differences between the settings, options, and some lenses as well.

Can anyone recommend some things that would make a good "test" image? (ie. something I can photograph over and over to really compare the differences in my settings).

I'm assuming something with black blacks and white whites with some sort of representing of at least the primary colours?

Cheers,

Lem

PS. Yes I'm Canadian and spell "colours" with a 'U' ;)
 
You mean something like this?
 
Possibly. That would help with noise and sharpness. But I'm also wondering about colour. Are the blues and greens at the bottom a good test? I'm trying to get a really good idea of the various Nikon picture settings (ie. vivid, neutral, standard) and the D lighting settings.

Lem
 
When color accuracy is critical, many use something like this - X-Rite ColorChecker Passport Software Of course, regularly calibrating your computer display is also a factor.

The colors a camera produces are interpolated with software algorithms. The image sensor only records grayscale, but the grayscale it records is influenced by a Bayer Array, or by being a Foveon type image sensor.

Nikon's picture settings get applied to JPEGs. JPEGs only have an 8-bit color depth. The original information has a 12-bit or 14-bit depth. Nikon pro and prosumer camera bodies can also capture TIFF files.

Plus those settings are applied equally to the entire JPEG (globally). For more precision and control many opt to capture photos as Raw data files and then apply adjustments locally in a photo.

You may benefit from ths small group of tutorials: Tutorials on Color Management & Printing
 
Oh do if I'm shooting RAW then the picture settings don't make a difference?

Lem
 
Oh do if I'm shooting RAW then the picture settings don't make a difference?

Lem

You won't see any difference between a raw and a jpeg image, either in your camera or on your computer monitor.
 
480sparky said:
You won't see any difference between a raw and a jpeg image, either in your camera or on your computer monitor.

I assume you mean it applies the picture settings to both? Because there is absolutely a difference when I look at full quality jpeg vs. 14 bit RAW.

Lem
 
I assume you mean it applies the picture settings to both?

Depends on the software you use. Some apply the camera settings by default, others allow you the option of applying them.

Because there is absolutely a difference when I look at full quality jpeg vs. 14 bit RAW.

Lem

Of course not. Your monitor is only capable of displaying at the jpeg (8-bit) level. Your 14-bit raw file is converted to an 8-bit image, so what you see on the screen in, in essence, a jpeg. The real difference is when you start editing an image. You can only edit a jpeg so much before it starts to fail. Raw allows far more editing with much less IQ degradation.
 
I've shot RAW + JPEG in a few occasions and the colours are completely different out of the camera. It may be white balance writing on the JPEG but it looked far more saturated in Aperture.

Lem
 
JPEGs and unedited Raw files will look different in editing software. Raw files will look different when converted in different Raw converters because each Raw converters algorithms are slightly different.

Cameras embed a JPEG Basic thumbnail in the Raw file to immediately show on the rear LCD, the histogram is also from that JPEG Basic thumbnail.

Nikon's D7000 has a rudimentary Raw (NEF) processing capability in the Retouch menu that outputs a JPEG. See page 258 of the D7000 user's manual.

Many computer displays display more than 8-bits of color per color channel.
 
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Thanks KmH. That's very helpful!

So back to the original question... I guess my best bet would be to simply shoot a colorful subject (something I would normally shoot) and just compare the images. And then for sharpness settings I can use the test pattern above.

I'm aware my monitor and software may display things differently than what the D7000 is actually doing. But I'm just looking for a point of reference.

Please let me know if anyone has any other recommendations :).

Lem
 

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