Types of lens

Discussion in 'Nikon Lenses' started by Rickjs, Oct 26, 2015.

  1. Rickjs

    Rickjs TPF Noob!

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    I was looking at some used lenses for my 3200 and read an article on the Nikon site explaining the different types of lenses. What is the difference between a D and a G lens. I want to be able to use auto focus and was told I would need to get a G lens. Is that correct?


     
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    That is correct. 'D' series lenses require an in-body focus motor or they will be MF only.
     
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  3. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    Not entirely true. I have a 17-35/2.8D AF-S lens with a built-in motor. There is no screw-drive focus coupler on it.
     
  4. Rickjs

    Rickjs TPF Noob!

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    I finally found a chart and it shows for the 3200 I would need either an AF-S or AF-I to be able to use auto focus. Is there something similar for Sigma or Tamron?
     
  5. Mr.Photo

    Mr.Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Sigma and Tamron both make lenses to work with the entry level D3xx and D5xx series Nikon bodies. Tamron calls their motors USD (Ultrasonic Silent Drive) and Sigma uses HSM (Hyper Sonic Motor).

    The tricky part about getting the Tamron or Sigma lenses is that if you're buying used you need to be careful what you get as Tamron and Sigma do not include in the lens name whether or not it is an older screw drive lens or a more modern lens with a built in focus motor. You can obviously tell if the lens has the built in motor from a picture (provided it is of the actual lens) by seeing if there is a switch on the side of the lens to switch from auto focus to manual focus. Another way to tell on these lenses is to count how many electrical contacts there are on the lens mount. The older screw driven lenses only used 5 contacts and the newer ones with the built in motors have 8 contacts.

    This is one of the main reasons I upgraded to my D7000 as it can use virtually every Nikon lens made since the late 1970's.
     
  6. cgw

    cgw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Search the archive here or just Google "Nikon AFD, AFS, AIS." Tons of info just a few clicks away.
     
  7. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    Silly me. I just look for the screw-drive coupler on the lens mount.
     
  8. Mr.Photo

    Mr.Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    That's true if you have the lens in hand or have a good photo of the back of the lens mount.
     
  9. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    Not hard to do on the innernets.
     

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