Why the hate on the Rebels??

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by squee, Aug 26, 2010.

  1. Dominantly

    Dominantly TPF Noob!

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    In MY face.

    ;)


     
  2. The Shoe

    The Shoe TPF Noob!

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    You people are nuts today.

    Personally, I hate Rebels. They keep blowing up perfectly good space stations.
     
  3. JIP

    JIP No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Weather or not it is the person I think owning a "professional" camera is a decent measure of a persons seriousness about being a photographer. I have seen many threads and complaints here and other places about so many amatuers getting into wedding photography and undercutting "professionals" and I think this is a response to that.
     
  4. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    +1
    There are a lot of rebels out there and in the hands of the right person, with the right lenses and the right lighting/light control they can and will produce fantastic photos - pro grade photos. However many who shoot with rebels and apply for jobs are going to be this new "bought a DSLR now I'm a pro" kind of user. By removing rebels from the options its rather like turning away point and shoot camera bodies - the hirer is trying to avoid lots of novice "pros" and get at the real professionals - many of which whilst having the skills and support gear to use a rebel well will have upgraded their camera body to something more versatile and, well more pro.

    It's a simple filter for quick and easy filtering - like when you go to sports matches and they won't let lenses in over a certain length or size.
     
  5. MrLogic

    MrLogic TPF Noob!

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    I question any pro who doesn't buy the best gear he or she can afford - relative to their photography needs.

    Besides, is there a good reason to use a DSLR with a 1.6x or 1.5x "crop factor"... if you are a wedding photographer?
     
  6. JClishe

    JClishe No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Another +1

    I suspect people are linking a person's photographic experience with their financial investment in camera equipment. Ie., if you "only" have a Rebel than you must be some Johnny come lately wanna be photographer.

    Which of course isn't true, you can stick expensive L glass in front of a Rebel and have made more of an investment than someone with a higher end body but cheaper glass (and therefore even get better photos than them, in the right lighting).

    Like the previous poster said, it's a quick filter.
     
  7. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The 7D has a 1.6 crop sensor and its pretty pro - whilst the 1DMIV is a 1.3 crop - so the reason for using 1.6 or 1.3 crop in a wedding is probably similar to why people use only 35mm fullframe camera bodies instead of medium or even large format camera bodies.
     
  8. aadhils

    aadhils TPF Noob!

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    Basically any average Joe can buy a rebel (and they do).

    Saying "no rebels" would cut down a lot of Photographers who've just bought a Rebel and now think they can take outstanding photos because they have a "pro" camera.

    I sort of thought the same thing until I took a few photography classes and found out how much I don't know :blushing:
     
  9. squee

    squee TPF Noob!

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    I paid nearly $600 for my rebel kit alone. How is that affordable for any Joe photographer?

    One of the people saying this in an ad I emailed anyway and told her the rest of my gear and showed her some of my newborn work. She hired me. Then I told her when I met her in person that some of the shots were with a point and shoot. She was surprised. Ha.

    I dunno. I had a choice between the Nikon price equivalent of a Rebel (forgot the model) or the Rebel. I choose the Rebel because I'd wanted one for 5 or 6 years and I'd kick myself if I didn't get it when I got the chance.
     
  10. JClishe

    JClishe No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    It's certainly within range of the average Joe that thinks that stepping into an entry level dSLR is suddenly going to let them take better pictures than a high end P&S. (even though said average Joe probably knows nothing about photography)
     
  11. MrLogic

    MrLogic TPF Noob!

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    "full frame" has advantages over medium and large format (high ISO performance, speed, flexibility)... and vice versa. Same with film vs. digital.

    1.6x crop sensor DSLRs - pro or not - have advantages, too, but those do not apply to wedding photography, as far as I know.

    Why would a wedding photographer use a 1.6x crop body, if better options exist?
     
  12. Dao

    Dao No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Of course there are exception. My good friend called me last week, his sis-in-law contacted him and asked for help because she just bought a Canon camera from bestbuy and do not know how to turn it on. And the camera is the EOS 7D kit.

    My friend was able to help her to turn on the camera, but later on she said everything came out blur. So my friend called me.

    Of course, I do not think I can help too much. The only advice I have my friend tell her was, turn on the camera, dial the top wheel (M, Av, Tv ....) to the Green rectangle, point, half press and then shoot. Of course, RTFM as well.

    However, since she has a 7D now, so she can apply for the contract. LOL.



    But in general, most of the photographer who own a higher end body have more experience. I know there are examples like the one I just mentioned. And I know people who has Rebels can take great photos. Or Video now.

    One of my friend is a videographer, he just starts building a video recording equipment with a Rebel. Here are couple photos of the initial setup.

    http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos..._424408839891_596629891_4856344_3120487_n.jpg

    http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos..._424408834891_596629891_4856343_7454893_n.jpg


    That is a Rebel, but I think it's not bad.
     

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