Working with begginer models - POSE!

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by trinidadgonzalezsardi, Aug 8, 2017.

  1. trinidadgonzalezsardi

    trinidadgonzalezsardi TPF Noob!

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    Hey guys! My question is: how do you direct a begginer model? What are your 'go to' poses? And what do you keep in mind when shooting portraits or any other photo with models? Thanks!


     
  2. astroNikon

    astroNikon 'ya all Bananas I tell 'ya Supporting Member

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    The pose depends upon what you are looking for and the style that you want.
    You'll have to know how to pose someone. Do not read on the internet about "poses" as everything I've read is too basic for a complete understanding. This is where actually buying books about it can help.

    If you gave us a specific situation, location, and what you are looking to accomplish I'm sure many of the Pros can help.

    For instance, I've in the past bought these books, which are all different styles for different things.
    Studio Fashion/Portrait Photography ==> https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1608956229/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    General Classic Family Portraits ==> https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1608957012/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Posing for Photographers and Models ==> https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0321966465/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Boudoir photography/posing ==> Amazon.com: Sultry, Sweet or Sassy: The Professional Photographer's Guide to Boudoir Photography Techniques (9781608957217): Kay Eskridge: Books

    Of course, there's all different in technique and styles as the end result for each is totally different.
    So you'll have to learn what you are after and the posing techniques in detail, then you'll know more about how to pose someone.

    The "Posing for Photographers and Models" is pretty good for a first book about posing. It goes over every little detail.

    There's also other books that can be more granular about every little nuance of the body, etc. It all comes down to you investing the time to learn. As we could just tell you a pose, but you'll have to know all the details of that pose, and how to settle the model so that they are comfortable.

    We have some excellent Professional TPF members here that can help. I'm sure they'll chime in shortly.
     
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  3. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Be very specific when giving directions. Don't assume any prior knowledge until the model demonstrates that he/she understands.

    If you want the hand higher, say so. If you want the head turned just so, make it easy for the model to hit the mark, such as; "point your chin (up, down, left, right)" and so on. Say where you want the eyes, how you want the mouth, and everything. Beginner models might not have any idea of how to pose, so it will be a teaching experience for you, and a learning experience for the model. Go easy, take some breaks, provide water and a place to sit.

    Male photographers should never touch the model, the clothing, or hair. If you want to move a bit of hair, ask permission and explain exactly what you are doing.

    Take along a book or some printed photographs that show the poses you want. Show the model, and see if she/he can mimic the pose. Always praise any good attempt. If you are good at posing, you can try to demonstrate the pose for the model to mimic.

    Before you plan the shoot, study how other photographers have posed their models so you're not fumbling at the last minute while the model is losing interest. Show the model some of the better shots during a break in the shooting. Point out the good parts, include some coaching if it's not quite what you're looking for.

    Do not run overtime, especially with a new model. Respect the model's time schedule just as you expect her/him to respect yours. Pay promptly according to your previously negotiated rate/schedule. Be sure to praise the model quite a lot if he/she is earnestly trying, and thank your model at the end of the shoot.
     
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  4. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Excellent advise above. A few points I'll add: Don 't hide behind your camera or at the other end of the studio. When you need to give direction, come toward the model and put your camera down; look at and talk to the model. Be relaxed, even if he or she is frustrating the Hades out of you, remain calm and professional, and repeat yourself ten times if necessary. Make sure you qualify your direction as well; don't simply say, "Move your hand", but rather, "Raise your left hand so that the thumb is against your cheek" or similar. Demonstrate what you want as you say, so when you're saying, "Raise your left hand so that the thumb is against your cheek", you're doing the same thing. Don't talk down to the model he or she is just as important and talented as you are. Use proper names for body parts, especially if doing nude or semi-nude work.
     
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  5. astroNikon

    astroNikon 'ya all Bananas I tell 'ya Supporting Member

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    I also will do the pose in front of the model.
    Going over each step and having the model do each adjustment as I do it (depending what it is)
    And you'll have to emphasize the importance of each adjustment. just the basic, putting one's weight on the back leg you emphasize by lifting the front leg so show there's no weight on the front leg.

    Then have the model breathe in and out to relax. and depending upon the lip position I always tell them to slowly say "iiii oooo .. oooohhhh" or "I Love You" if you know them really good. .. of course depending upon the type of pose. That will give you 3 distinct mouth/lip positions which you may or may not be after.

    There's so much ... I'm sure everyone could write a detailed book, which is why it's better to buy posing books.

    As mentioned above, I actually keep specific photos of specific poses on my iPhone for quick reference for what I'm after in a shoot. And I usually detail out the shoot and pose specifics. Essentially plan out each pose just like you plan out each location, time or day/lighting, etc.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2017
  6. idcanyon

    idcanyon No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I've seen several incredibly useful posing classes on Creative Live, such as this one: Posing 101 with Lindsay Adler | CreativeLive.
    They say this one is airing for free again on August 14-15, or you can purchase it.
     
  7. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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  8. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    If you can a mirror can be of great help. A full body one if you're doing full body poses that way the person can see what you're seeing in real time. It might well help them to "see" what they are doing wrong (showing the back of your camera helps, but because its happening after the event it might take them longer to get what's wrong specifically). Even just one for the face/head would be a big help in guiding the model, especially if they are new.

    I would argue that gender is unimportant and that you should have a no touching policy in general no matter the gender of model and photographer.

    Looks kind of like what you can get off a 100-400mm (at least the MK1 not sure about the II) or even a 70-200mm f2.8 with 2*TC at times. As its an outside shot it wouldn't surprise me if it is one of the superzoom type lenses.
     
  9. jcdeboever

    jcdeboever TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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  10. JoeW

    JoeW Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Lots of good advice in this thread. Also...print out some sample poses. Not to copy, but to help illustrate the concept or to start with (and then you tweak or change). Also, some models find it helpful to have a mirror in the room that they can look at and see what they look like. Also, take an initial shot and then walk over the model and show him/her the back of your camera, then critique what you see and the two of you talk about what stays and what needs to change.
     
  11. Casey08

    Casey08 TPF Noob!

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    You didn't mention male or female model. For female photography I would recommend look up poses on Pinterest or even YouTube. For male photography there are less information. I found these article quite interesting Catching mens fashion photography poses
    And practice, practice, practice my friend
     
  12. TheLibrarian

    TheLibrarian TPF Noob!

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    Depends what you're going for and male or female. Couple things i use or keep in mind.

    A male classic pose is sitting with feet shoulder width apart shoulders over the knees, hands or elbow i believe on the knees. A bit awkward but 15th century portrait kind of classic. maybe makes the shoulders seem larger being forward and is powerful.

    For men or women there is basic sitting, standing, leaning against a wall one foot back against the wall type of thing. I also like them at least for women to be toward the wall head to the side and shoot down the wall. Also walking or a pronounced strut/ swagger.

    There is the tinkerbell butt and chest out, arched back, hands down and out maybe one hand up around the shoulder or both hands flat on a table shot most likely from the side. Always arching the back. Another thing is you shouldn't lean forward at the waist if the stomach is exposed as it creates folds.

    Artsy stuff often looks a bit contorted (think Madonnas Vogue video maybe more drappy) maybe as trying to piece together many principles like with the waist. Can seem stiff but also seems certified artsy. Too I'll try to get a position which maybe i'm making up at the moment but when i find how i want them they've bent in so many ways it seems stiff and unnatural. I'll say shake it out and release then more naturally go into the kind of position once found.

    Encouragement is best. Instead of saying not like that say what should be done.

    Some more sultry things I like squatting with back against the wall. On back with legs in the air like a ww2 bomber girl. Laying on stomach, hands folded under chin legs bent at the knees or not.

    The special K: up on one foot/ tip toes, other leg bent at hip and knee, hands down and out to the side a bit like the tinkerbell or swinging out front and back like some kind of dance curtsey if you remember the old special k commercials. I'm trying to think how they did the top of the K.

    Hands 1 or 2 near the chin, behind the head, or over the stomach (pretty much anywhere but nice to have some things to try if you're flustered and wondering what to do next). look toward, look away, from the back looking backwards maybe with a skippy walk like we're going through the field. Various emotions in the face. Hands over the face or covering part of the face or framing the eyes and shooting mostly the eyes.

    I'm sure it could go on.
     
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