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Wow i thought i was seeing things..snowing and temps in the 20's...Knee high snow mounds.. and here come the robins!! I reported the sighting and lucky for me i had photos to prove it ..THERE MUST HAVE BEEN between 25-50 spread through the trees
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Nice shots. We have been seeing a lot of them around here for the last few weeks.
 
they can stay as long as they don't crap on my car. seems like everything is a little confused this year.
 
they can stay as long as they don't crap on my car. seems like everything is a little confused this year.

Must be nice to have more animals around. It's a little scarce around here right now.
 
Completely different from our strain of Robin albeit of the same family I presume?
 
I heard on the radio yesterday about a Brown Pelican found in New England that had to be rescued, and then rehabilitated. It was then flown to Florida to continue it's recovery. Good to hear about " good " news for a change, don't you think?
 
I heard on the radio yesterday about a Brown Pelican found in New England that had to be rescued, and then rehabilitated. It was then flown to Florida to continue it's recovery. Good to hear about " good " news for a change, don't you think?
always good to hear about a rescue or save.. i would rather not know when this does not have a happy ending.. just found out so much info about robins being in winter..


One reason why they seem to disappear every winter is that their behavior changes. In winter robins form nomadic flocks, which can consist of hundreds to thousands of birds. Usually these flocks appear where there are plentiful fruits on trees and shrubs, such as crabapples, hawthorns, holly, juniper, and others.

When spring rolls around, these flocks split up. Suddenly we start seeing American Robins yanking worms out of our yards again, and it’s easy to assume they’ve “returned” from migration. But what we’re seeing is the switch from being nonterritorial in the winter time to aggressively defending a territory in advance of courting and raising chicks. This behavioral switch is quite common in birds.

You can report your robin sightings (and any other birds you see) at eBird. Read more about American Robins in our All About Birds Species guide.
 
Nice in-tree shots. I hope they know something I don't.
 
Nice in-tree shots. I hope they know something I don't.
thank you...i was thinking the same thing.. maybe it is possible.. somehow i doubt it though..
 
That’s unusual for this time of year. The information you provided was interesting. I did not know that. Although I have seen them show up in the spring by the 100’s and seems like the next day they have dispersed.
 
Saw a couple the other day when I was cleaning snow off my woodpile. Nice to hear that cheerful song of theirs again.
 
I heard on the radio yesterday about a Brown Pelican found in New England that had to be rescued, and then rehabilitated. It was then flown to Florida to continue it's recovery. Good to hear about " good " news for a change, don't you think?
always good to hear about a rescue or save.. i would rather not know when this does not have a happy ending.. just found out so much info about robins being in winter..


One reason why they seem to disappear every winter is that their behavior changes. In winter robins form nomadic flocks, which can consist of hundreds to thousands of birds. Usually these flocks appear where there are plentiful fruits on trees and shrubs, such as crabapples, hawthorns, holly, juniper, and others.

When spring rolls around, these flocks split up. Suddenly we start seeing American Robins yanking worms out of our yards again, and it’s easy to assume they’ve “returned” from migration. But what we’re seeing is the switch from being nonterritorial in the winter time to aggressively defending a territory in advance of courting and raising chicks. This behavioral switch is quite common in birds.

You can report your robin sightings (and any other birds you see) at eBird. Read more about American Robins in our All About Birds Species guide.


Great Backyard Bird Count 2021—share your love of birds! - eBird
 
I just saw 2 robins by Ontario Lake yesterday. It was 9 degrees F. Not sure what they eat- berries I guess.

Doing the bird count this year and reported them.
 

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