Question about low-light and flash

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by jansch, Mar 20, 2010.

  1. jansch

    jansch TPF Noob!

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    Hello,

    So I've been taking photographs early morning, when the light isn't very good. Not been carrying my tripod, so end up clicking at 1/5, 1/6 th, which is why the photograph doesn't look sharp.

    My question is, without the tripod, what do I do in such a situation? And if I must use flash, the exposure meter doesn't really detect that the flash is on, and so doesn't adjust the exposure accordingly, so I'll still get a slow shutter speed. Do I under-expose and use flash?

    Or a tripod is an absolute must in such situations? Because I left my aperture wide open, and ISO (although I didn't check) was at 1600. Hence there's no other way I can get more light to come in but the shutter speed? Will using flash the situation?

    Thanks in advance.. :)
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Using flash can help to freeze somethings, but only things that are lit by the flash, and not too much ambient light. For example, a person who isn't too far away from the camera.

    But if you are shooting landscape type photos, While the flash may illuminate the foreground, but you may still get blur from thing lit with ambient light. You could increase the shutter speed to where you won't get blur from camera shake, but then the ambient exposure will likely be very underexposed.

    Long answer short...just use a tripod, or just find something to set the camera on so you don't have to touch it when it fires.
     
  3. dyyylan

    dyyylan TPF Noob!

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    In low-light you have to decide what options you have and which would be the best way to capture what you're going for...

    - Use a tripod with a longer exposure at the aperture size you want with low ISO
    - Use a small aperture and high ISO to get the shutter speed you want (if possible)
    - Use flashes with the appropriate shutter speed/aperture if the subject is close with low ISO
    - Some combination of the above
     
  4. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    The single most common error most amateur photographers make is not using a good, rock solid, stable tripod and head.

    The second most common error most amateur photographers make is getting a tripod and head that is not stable enough to be really useful. (i.e., to cheap) Many don't get it right until they have purchased tripod #3 or #4, an expensive way to finally wind up with the right one.

    A good, stable tripod will last a photographer 25+ years. In that time the photographer will likely have owned several different camera bodies, a plethora of lenses, and umpteen camera bags.
     
  5. SushiWarrior

    SushiWarrior TPF Noob!

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    QFT, I think I may have such a tripod. Definitely worth a big investment! Good tripods LAST!
     
  6. PJL

    PJL TPF Noob!

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    A remote shutter release is also handy to get the sharpest shots. Some SLRs also have a "mirror lock-up" function so that the only thing moving when you press the shutter release is the shutter itself.
     

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