Silly question...really it is

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by djtyrrell, Feb 26, 2007.

  1. djtyrrell

    djtyrrell TPF Noob!

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    Difference between brightness and contrast? :S

    Sorry i would rather know

    Stu
     
  2. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    Brightness (not really a great photographic term) would be the general, overall exposure, or "brightness" of the image. Contrast is the difference between the lightest and darkest tones in the image. A high contrast image would have a large difference between highlight and shadow, having deep blacks, and bright white highlights. A low contrast image would have a small difference between tones, having greyish blacks and greyish whites.

    Contrast can be illustrated with color as well. Colors opposite one another on the color wheel produce color contrast when used together in an image.
     
  3. Majik Imaje

    Majik Imaje TPF Noob!

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    lack of contrast makes a picture look muddy or greyish sort of..

    higher contrast will increase the distance between the whites and blacks giving them a more pronounced look.

    but when blacks are muddy and not SHARP LOOKING RENDITIONS OF BLACK and when Whites are dull grey-ish looking.. .. ..

    that is lack of contrast and it can be increased in a number of ways and methods as you will soon learn later.


    Experiment with your computer monitor to see the difference in any image you place on that monitor.. this is a great way to understand and learn the difference.. > practice !


    The only "silly" question is the one you refuse to ask!
     
  4. The_Traveler

    The_Traveler Completely Counter-dependent Supporting Member

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  5. Majik Imaje

    Majik Imaje TPF Noob!

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    ROFLMAO !!!

    OK.. HA HA HA HA.. SORRY.. HA HA HA HA..

    OH PLEASE!.. .. I was born at night .. .. .. but not last night.!


    1: I am a certified electronics CRYPTO REPAIR !

    2. I adjust my gamma in 3d programs all the time

    3. I have had my monitors up and down the scale for different purposes,
    zillions of times..

    4. NO COMMENT.. ROFLMAO!!
     
  6. The_Traveler

    The_Traveler Completely Counter-dependent Supporting Member

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    I will spell this out in even simpler terms so that all responders will understand.

    It is dangerous to manipulate contrast on your monitor to view prints; not actually dangerous from an actual physical viewpoint but because monitors should be maintained at an industry specified standard so that you will always be seeing what others see - and vice versa.

    If you change the contrast to view a particular image, you will constantly need to recalibrate your monitor to the standard. This is not particularly difficult but tedious and time-consuming.

    I usually calibrate my monitors once a week using a GretagMacBeth Eye-One, although I am certain that there a very experienced people who can calibrate using only a ball of string, a needle and some hot wax.
     
  7. burtharrris

    burtharrris TPF Noob!

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    Honestly. Grow up. I can tell from your posts that you have a lot of great knowledge that you can share, please do it in a respectful manner. Thank you.
     
  8. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    This is a very strange reply ...
     
  9. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Perhaps so but Traveler is correct nevertheless. Digital color management is a futile business without a standard to which to compare. The calibrated monitor becomes that standard in digital image processing.
     
  10. Majik Imaje

    Majik Imaje TPF Noob!

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    Dangerous ! ? Absolutely not. That word is "mis-used" and not relevant.

    I was merely trying to show an individual how to see what low contrast LOOKS LIKE.

    it would have taken one or two images for this person TO UNDERSTAND what I was talking about! I am sorry for my childish outburst. & I am 100% serious.. I got no problem ever, EVER admitting when I am WRONG!

    IT DOES not bother me, or make me feel inferior to say.. I AM WRONG!

    I love the TRUTH I embrace the truth with all my being. Now when I want to teach someone a SIMPLE test.. how to see what high/low contrast does to an image.. try this.


    NOW LET ME EXPLAIN.

    I use dual monitors... 21"

    each monitor has a contrast control.. so for the purpose of this "test"

    I will click on the contrast control button and I see it is set for 92 the actual number is NOT IMPORTANT. but it is.

    they open a nice image that is pleasing to look at, with lots of different colors.

    I take my contrast control and go from 92 down to 52.. I see the difference immediately. and then go back to 92 and the test has been finished.

    where is the "danger"? Please elaborate! I guarantee you.. that what you see in your monitor is NOT EXACT to what my monitor is showing.

    but very close. I can have my monitor set for different color temps as most do.. and it doesn't matter which temp your viewing; your images will be printed based on the ICC color profile you have your printer set to!

    The most important adjustment on YOUR MONITOR is "gamma"!

    that must be set correctly. WITHIN REASON..

    I have a dozen color printers. ALL EPSON & one HP (HIGH END).

    WHAT I view on my monitor, comes out of my printer, exact, even though I might increase the contrast for a print or adjust it lower for a PRINT.

    but calibrate once a week? I am sorry I don't by that one bit. I have had my dual 21" for 8 years. NOT ONCE have I ever had to calibrate them. Out of the box, onto the huge desk.. side by side.. beside that are two more monitors.. 19" cheap monitors. they don't have the "PUNCH" that my 21" have. Viewsonic vs. generic off brand name. The 19" do in no way show what my 21" show, they have't the same resolution, resolving capabilities as the expensive monitors. they can't come close to matching my display, yet when the computer sends a signal to the printer, both computers,using the same program(Adobe PS.) and the same ICC color
    profile, I get the same results. and pardon me sir! it has nothing to do with how the contrast or how the color temps is set for the MONITOR.

    Now.. please explain in detail how some people can do this with wax? or a string?

    I want to LEARN! my viewsonics have never been adjusted or calibrated in 8 years.

    One final point.. have four sons.. we have 6 computers 12 monitors.

    There is one control.. if misused can cause MAJOR PROBLEMS. but the manufacurers have put a limit on this control so that the screen CANNOT IMPLODE!

    Again.. let me apologize for being WRONG. (In my outburst).

    but I don't buy what your trying to "teach" this individual that has expressed difficulty in learning what CONTRAST entails or means or to see the results

    I suppose I could have said.. open an image in photoshop go to the top menu Image > adjustments > Brightness/Contrast and play with those controls to see the difference.

    I chose a much SIMPLER method, that is SAFE, EASY, and you can find your way back with no problem of getting LOST! or damaging your monitor.

    One last point.. "I really was born. at night"!.. .. .. .. .. BUT!.... .. !

    AGAIN... let me apologize. for being wrong (in my childish OUTBURST)!
     
  11. The_Traveler

    The_Traveler Completely Counter-dependent Supporting Member

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    Even if you have adjusted your printers to give you what your monitor shows you, if the monitors are not calibrated to a standard, you have no idea whether your images will display on other person's monitors the way they display on yours.

    That is why speedometers on different vehicles are calibrated to the same standard. So that when you think you are going 65, the police think the same thing.

    Thank you but I don't need lessons in the use of the English language. You just don't understand.
     

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