Anyone Recognize This Bird?

SCraig

Been spending a lot of time on here!
Joined
Nov 12, 2011
Messages
6,474
Reaction score
2,450
Location
Nashville, TN
Website
sc-photo-tn.com
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
Does anyone recognize this bird? These are pretty healthy crops because it would never got close to me. It was flying around over a lake here in Nashville, but I can't find anything that looks right for it. It has a kind of heron-ish appearance with that beak but kind of a gull-ish appearance with those wings. If anyone has any ideas I'd appreciate a point in the right direction.

2013-07-28-01.jpg


2013-07-28-02.jpg
 

shefjr

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
Jan 18, 2012
Messages
1,595
Reaction score
418
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
I would say maybe a caspian tern or royal tern
 
OP
SCraig

SCraig

Been spending a lot of time on here!
Joined
Nov 12, 2011
Messages
6,474
Reaction score
2,450
Location
Nashville, TN
Website
sc-photo-tn.com
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
I think you guys are right, but I think John (Shep) was closer. I think it's a Caspian Tern since All About Birds states that the Royal Tern is "A large, orange-billed tern, the Royal Tern is found only along ocean beaches" and this was not along an ocean beach. Lake, yes, but we're 500 miles from the nearest ocean.

The Caspian Tern, also according to All About Birds has a dark tip on its bill and this one does. While it isn't normal to this area Tennessee is on its migration route.

Thanks for the help guys!
 

sm4him

In memoriam
Supporting Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2011
Messages
10,726
Reaction score
5,468
Location
The Beautiful Hills of East Tennessee
Website
sm4him.500px.com
Can others edit my Photos
Photos OK to edit
Gulls and terns, I've decided, are even harder to distinguish than sparrows.

I'd probably guess Caspian on this as well, but another possibility is a Forster's tern, which are migratory in Tennessee. The Forster's have the black cap when they are in breeding plumage, so perhaps this one's plumage is just changing.

Do you have any pictures of it that show the tail better? The Forster's tern has a deeply forked tail, whereas the Caspian's tail is much shorter and not forked.

Nice shots of it, by the way; I especially like that first one!
 
OP
SCraig

SCraig

Been spending a lot of time on here!
Joined
Nov 12, 2011
Messages
6,474
Reaction score
2,450
Location
Nashville, TN
Website
sc-photo-tn.com
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
I have a not-very-good shot that shows the tail. It's certainly not what I'd call "Forked" and is pretty short. The photos I looked at of the Forsters Tern appear to have a more slender beak as well, not quite as deep and heavy as this one appears.

2013-07-28-10.jpg
 

Most reactions

ClickASnap

New Topics

Top