Is there any downside of using fullframe lens on a crop sensor body?

Discussion in 'Sony Cameras' started by donscot, Oct 21, 2019.

  1. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    26090731.DSCF0268_Feb15_shower.jpg ..I have one plastic mount lens the old Nikon 28 to 80 D series, from the film days of the 1990s. So far it has held together for over 15 years for me, and I have made some decent pictures with it including one of my very favorite pictures of my young son. The 28-80mm D is a wobbly lens... the front extending part of the zoom barrel wobbles quite a bit, but I bought it and used it on my Nikon d2x around 2005. I think I paid $35 for it. This is a full-frame zoom lens used on a crop-frame Nikon, and this photo made around 2006 is perhaps one of my all-time favorite shots of my young son.


     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2019
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  2. photoflyer

    photoflyer TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    You disagreed with my post but this appears to make my point. I have both of these lenses. I can't put the 18-55 EF/S on the full frame but I can put the 24-105 on both. When I want to shoot landscapes on the crop I use the 18-55 even though the 24-105 is L glass and much better quality. The 18-55 gives a wider view on the crop body.
     
  3. weepete

    weepete TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Yes, I did. If you want an explaination here you go:

    It's got nothing to do with the lens mount, so an EF lens will give the same image as an EF-S lens of the same focal length when mounted on the same camera body. It's to do with sensor size and the portion on the image circle that's covered by the sensor.

    Also effective focal length is actually a thing in optics. By definition, the effective focal length is the distance between the rear principal point, and the rear focal point of the lens.

    Plus the focal length does not change, so a 300mm lens is still a 300mm lens no matter if it's mounted on a crop, full frame, medium format, m4/3rds, or large format or whatever.
     
  4. photoflyer

    photoflyer TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    One hundred percent true. But when I shoot sports I have the 300 F4 on the crop because it is equivalent to 480 mm relative to the same lens on the full frame. I use the 70-200 on the full frame. This first gives me the maximum reach and the second is best for when the action is close.

    The semantics of this are interesting. It reminds me of something in aviation. Cessna put a 160 hp engine on the 172. Then, later you could upgrade to 180 hp by simply changing the prop. So was it really still 160 or was it 180? The answer is that it is the combination of the two that results in one or the other.
     
  5. petrochemist

    petrochemist TPF junkie!

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    The crop factor you're quoting is a function of the sensor & applies to any lenses, it doesn't change between EF & EF/S lenses.
     
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  6. petrochemist

    petrochemist TPF junkie!

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    The flange focal distance of EF & EF-S lenses IS the same (44mm) but the glass elements of the EF-S sometimes come further behind the flange than the do on EF. This causes the risk that the larger mirror on FF & APSH bodies will foul on the rear element.

    The mirrorless mounts made by Canon have quite different flange focal distances (18mm for the EF-M & 20mm for newer the EF-R), as indeed do their old FD lenses (42mm), their cinematic mounts (29mm or 20mm on the VL range) & their original screw mount (28.8mm)...
    I don't know of anyone else who has had quite as many complete redesigns of their lens mounts as Canon has!

    Nikon, Sony & Pentax stick to a single flange distance for all the minor variants of their SLR mounts & then use another single value for their mirrorless mounts - in the case of Pentax the same SLR mount was used for their mirrorless body.
     
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  7. weepete

    weepete TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Use it for any reason you like mate! But to use your engine analogy don't try and tell me that changing the prop increases the size of your cylinders!
     
  8. beagle100

    beagle100 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    actually Canon EF-S lens can be used on full frame camera bodies ... (with modification)
    but it's much easier with mirrorless
    www.flickr.com/photos/mmirrorless
     
  9. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    I would love to hear about this EF-S on full-frame Canon body modification. You are the first person I've ever heard who has said that this is possible. I can't imagine how this is done since the ef-s lenses are allowed to protrude farther into the body, and the rear elements on various ef-s lenses are in grave danger of being struck by the mirror on full frame cameras.
     
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  10. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I've heard it done with a few of them and some of the 3rd party ones. However its a very hit and miss thing. Some don't protrude to far into the barrel and its all fine; some are very hairs breadth distance from damage and others will cause damage. Basically you have to research it because if you get it wrong your mirror will hit the back of the lens. The lens will likely be fine (but any marks on the rear element will appear in photos); whilst the mirror will likely break the mechanism which means an expensive mirror replacement.
     
  11. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I see what you did there. :cool:
     
  12. vin88

    vin88 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    bad engine example, try again. vin
     

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