MF on 50mm lens

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by TheoHusky, Aug 20, 2017.

  1. TheoHusky

    TheoHusky TPF Noob!

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    Hello! I need to practice with MF 'cause AF isn't working on the things of same colour (for example white on white and AF doesn't catch it and doesn't take photos). But I see some problems in my practices... The "dead rose 1" from this ulbom is redacted with contrast and it seems so unnatural I think. The second one is my fav 'cause I didn't touch it at all. And the third is redacted a bit with contrast too. Others are with a bit of white balance redactions.
    Album: Items
    What can you say about all of it? Any advices? I'll gladly hear all of your opinions how to improve with taking photos with MF on 50mm lenses.


     
  2. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    At close distances, like those, there is NOT much depth of field! The lens must be stopped down to a small-sized aperture if you want deeper depth of field and more of the subject in good focus. A "best practice" in the digital imaging era is to tripod-mount the camera, and do a focus-stack sequence, where the manually-set focusing point is actually MOVED, from close to far, or from far to close, over a sequence of at least three frames, and the resulting images are then later merged or "focus stacked" in software, creating a crisp, deep depth of field image, with everything in good focus.

    An older method is focus bracketing, where you set up the shot, and then take multiple shots, with the focus point moved a bit differently, in each frame; then, select the best one. Again, this is done using f/16 or f/22 at such close-up ranges as you were working at.

    Another older method, one I use a lot, is "stopped down focusing", which is manually stopping the lens down using the DOF preview button, then setting the focus distance by hand-and-eye and by experience; this is not easy for many people, and takes practice, and some experience, but it CAN be done, especially at longer distances; in close-range work, this is probably the least-preferrable method, but at 10,15,20,30 feet with a 50mm lens, it can be very fast, and pretty good. (Some cameras lack a DOF preview button, making this not always possible to do.)

    White balance needs to be set, either in Degrees Kelvin, or to a factory pre-set, or off of a white target like a styrofoam coffee cup.
     
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  3. jcdeboever

    jcdeboever TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Practice rocking your body onto focus of subject. Set the depth of field on your lens providing it gives it to you. Figure out your position in relation to dof and rock in and out of it. Practice, practice, practice.
     
  4. TheoHusky

    TheoHusky TPF Noob!

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    Oh, thank you for the tips! I usually use AF or MF at long distances and close-ups are hard for me. And what do you think about macro lenses? I wanna buy Sigma AF 80-300mm for this and for taking photos at long distances too (like in zoos or parks). But the question is... I see that f/4-5,6. Idk if I'd have a chance to change that to f/20 and so.
     
  5. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    For your small macro work. You might consider a focusing rail. The prices for off brand ones are very reasonable now. You set focus on the camera then use the rail to move it in or out to get what you want in sharp focus. Of course need a steady tripod. And you should be either using a remote release, or the self timer on the camera.

    For macro lens the Tokina 100mm f/2.8 AT-X Pro D is a VERY good lens for 1/3 of Nikons or Canon variety.

    The Sigma 80-300 is a Jack of all lenses. Decent lens but not great at any specific job.
     
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  6. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    A 90mm f/2.8 Tamron AF macro, or the Tokina 100mm f/2.8 ATX-PRO macro would both be GOOD, solid choices for close-up pictures of small objects. Both are affordable. Look for used macro lenses.
     
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