Negatives Are Consistently Underexposed

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by OliverMcDermott, Mar 3, 2017.

  1. OliverMcDermott

    OliverMcDermott TPF Noob!

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    Hi All,

    I'll keep it brief,

    My Minolta XGM (1982) has underexposed a new, ISO 200 36 exp. Kodacolor roll (it's first roll in 10 years), 100% consistently - by around 1 stop. Film technology presumably has improved and as such 200 ISO is the new 100? I'm considering setting the ISO to 100 on the device, as this will likely resolve the issue.

    Guidance?


     
  2. jcdeboever

    jcdeboever TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Sounds like a plan. Keep in mind that the shutter speed may be the culprit as well. They do tend to be off a lot with a camera that old.
     
  3. OliverMcDermott

    OliverMcDermott TPF Noob!

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    Noted - the ISO dial actually allows me to set it between stops, so between 100 there's two options before 200, two options before 400, etc. I'll run a third test roll through it, with the ISO midway between 100 and 200, and drop it to 100 throughout the filim.

    You're referring to the metering system perhaps?
     
  4. limr

    limr Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I think he's referring to the actual shutter being a bit sluggish. The issue, then, is not that film has changed but your camera isn't performing the way it did in 1982. There are two possible solutions: check the shutter and fix as necessary, or, as you mentioned, just get used to shooting at slower than box speed.

    As for "200 being the new 100," I'm not really sure what you mean. ISO 100 and 200 still mean what they used to mean in that they refer to the relative light sensitivity of that film, and those levels of sensitivity have not changed. It doesn't mean that you automatically now expose for 100 when using 200 ISO. That's a function of your camera and your preference. I know people who regularly expose for half box speed because of their preferred developing methods, the look they desire, or the age of the film (fresh vs expired vs very expired.)
     
  5. OliverMcDermott

    OliverMcDermott TPF Noob!

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    I agree - I probably misunderstood the photographic store guy - ISO/ASA represent rules and 'it is what it is'
    Many people underexpose for digital imaging - and considering this issue is consistent - it will hopefully go away with use, or I'll permanently shoot below box speed, to your point.
     
  6. dxqcanada

    dxqcanada Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    If you are sure the meter is always 1 stop under ... then set the EV dial to +1 and keep it there.
     
  7. OliverMcDermott

    OliverMcDermott TPF Noob!

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    I've not shot enough filim to answer that ;)
    If I do that, then I'm going to lose one + stop, which I regularly use for evenings. (guide me here)
     
  8. OliverMcDermott

    OliverMcDermott TPF Noob!

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    I am aware that ISO can be rated differently (100 - 200 eg) depending on brand ?
     
  9. dxqcanada

    dxqcanada Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    The exposure comp is just to offset the metering/exposure issue you mentioned ... so you can keep setting the ISO dial to the matching setting.
    Yes, different brands and type of film have slight differences on how you want the film to look. In general I try not to under expose neg ... if you under expose you got nothing to work with when printing.
     
  10. limr

    limr Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I don't know about films being rated differently depending on brand, but I do know that some films of the same ISO have different latitude than others, or that respond differently to under/over exposure. For example, Kodak Tri-X (400) and Ilford HP5+ (400) are both rated the same, and they are both pretty forgiving of errors, but they respond differently at the ends of their ranges, so people may react by adjusting their exposure either up or down depending on which film they are using. Or take Tri-X vs Ilford Delta 400, which is pickier about exposure and can have lower contrast, so people may expose for it differently to get a different look than it would give at box speed.
     
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  11. KmH

    KmH In memoriam Supporting Member

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  12. snowbear

    snowbear fuzzy-wuzzy Supporting Member

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    Do you have access to an external meter or a DSLR? If so, try comparing that to the film camera's meter. If they are the same or very close, the issue is something else (like the shutter). If they vary quite a bit, then the meter (or light sensor, batteries, circuitry, ... ) is the problem.
     
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