photos blown out using natural light in doors

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by redbourn, Aug 16, 2016.

  1. Ysarex

    Ysarex Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    You don't have a light meter problem you have a lighting problem. A light meter would not fix or help this problem in any way. Variations in camera settings will not help this problem. Bottom line: you shot the plate backlit such that the primary subject is in shadow but you're trying to process the shot with the primary subject well-lit. All of the trouble you're having with this photo derives from the single root cause that the dominant light source is behind the subject.

    You can have a backlight in the photo if you want, but you can't fail to light the chicken in the front. Look at the chicken on the plate and see that it's casting a shadow toward you. It's a photo of the chicken. The chicken fills the bottom half of the frame. The bottom half of the frame is in shadow.

    Joe


     
  2. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    What does the histogram tell you? If the histogram indicates blown pixels, then yes.

    No, do not add more light. There is enough light already on the tops, so if anything, there may be too much light. When you stop down, that is when you need to add light (such as a reflector or low power flash) on the near side to light the near side ONLY a bit more. Be careful how you position the reflector so as to not overexpose the tops again.
     
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  3. redbourn

    redbourn No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    ISO remained the same.
     
  4. redbourn

    redbourn No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Thanks very much and will try again ..
     
  5. redbourn

    redbourn No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Just took this photo on my phone and in a way it's so demoralizing.

    minute steak.JPG

    None of the over exposure etc.

    Same lighting exactly as yesterday and just a simple snapshot.

    I want the best photos than I can personally shoot for my cookbook.

    Michael
     
  6. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    Then the only other thing that could have changed was the shutter speed. Either way, you should not have increased noise.
     
  7. Ysarex

    Ysarex Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Highlights are blown out. In fact you have more totally blown highlights in the food in this photo than in the chicken.

    It is not the same lighting as yesterday. The backlight is not as severe.

    Joe

     
  8. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    From a completely different angle.
     
  9. redbourn

    redbourn No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Well the shutter speed changed when I got to f22 so the the camera then said "too much noise; going to reduce it!".
     
  10. astroNikon

    astroNikon 'ya all Bananas I tell 'ya Supporting Member

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    he was probably in one of the auto modes ...
     
  11. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I`m going to respectfully disagree with you on this Joe. Using a spot meter to determine exposure for the highlights would allow the OP to calculate proper exposure for the overall scene. Granted, using strobed light only would make this whole process much easier, but if one wants to use ambient in a challenging lighting scenario like this, I would suggest a meter is essential.

    OP: You don`t need a $500+ Sekonic (`though it`s an excellent meter). For this particular scenario, I would recommend the Minolta Spot F (not that one in particular, just a link as an example).
     
  12. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The gold is metallic and will reflect more light. Limited effect is fine. You aren't trying to light subject, you are just filling in some shadows. What you are trying to do is to reduce the dynamic range of the subject. Some fill light should allow you to reduce the exposure value without losing all the shadows. Your eyes do a better job of dealing with high dynamic range than your sensor is. There are also some things you can do in post process to reduce dynamic range and, of course, there is always the use of multiple exposures at different exposure values which are combined with HDR software. Getting dynamic range under control is your goal.
     

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