Question about other sports photographers' photos

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by LCGLincle, Mar 2, 2017.

  1. LCGLincle

    LCGLincle TPF Noob!

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    Hi and good day! I am just wondering how does the sports photographers' photos look very bright, high quality and well-taken, compared to my shots on my Canon EOS Rebel T5 that are just mediocre, average or okay quality. I really wanted to do their shots someday, but I don't know how they do it and what camera or lens they use here, since I cannot view their EXIF data on their photos.

    Thanks in advanced and I hope someone will respond to me... :(


     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2017
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Those are what I would classify as "Okay" sports shots. There are two things to consider: (1) equipment; and (2) skill/experience. Good sports shooters use top-end bodies and lenses with very fast AF, excellent low-light performance and fast, constant aperture lenses. They also know the sport that they're shooting intimately and can anticipate what's going to happen next. You may not have the means to overcome equipment limitations but study and practice will go a LONG way to helping you in the skill/experience category. In other words: Keep practicing.
     
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  3. astroNikon

    astroNikon 'ya all Bananas I tell 'ya Supporting Member

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    ^^ as above stated.

    Once you get to sports you'll be dealt with possibly indoor poor uneven lighting.
    That's where the camera body and lenses come into play, no cheap way around it sometimes.

    Sports requires a Shutter Speed to stop motion, which normally is high - you cannot short cut this. In an indoor arena to get an even exposure you have to compensate that high shutter speed with more light to the sensor or ISO. To get more light you compensate by using a Pro lens with a constant aperture such as f/2.8 throughout it's entire focal range - such as the 70-200/2.8's. Then you probably still have to compensate with a higher ISO still.

    Then know how your camera functions in relation to it's AutoFocus system. And use the most appropriate settings for the situation.

    And, as mentioned, you have to know the sport. If your camera is "slow" to take a shot you have to compensate timing for that. I use 2 very fast shooting cameras (from finger press to image capture) and I definitely notice the large difference when I try using a parents camera for some shots for them for indoor basketball/soccer.

    It's probably best to post some of your photos, including your settings for those photos. And we can guide you to how to improve them with your specific camera.
     
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  4. astroNikon

    astroNikon 'ya all Bananas I tell 'ya Supporting Member

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  5. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I agree with tireiron that those images are merely okay. Action/sport photography is extremely challenging in terms of equipment and skill. Indoor sports takes that challenge up a level or two. Sports Illustrated basketball photos, most often, will be shot with strobes positioned high in the rafters of indoor sporting arenas. You don't have that luxury and please , please, please ... never use an on-camera flash which may affect a player's vision. Indoor action/sports is a genre of photography where proper equipment makes a significant difference between mediocre and good.

    I know nothing about a T5, but for indoor sports you need fast lenses and high ISO and a reasonably fast shutter speed. Every arena is different, but I suspect that at a minimum you will need ISO 1600, more than likely ISO 3200. At a minimum shutter speed set around 1/250 - 1/500 of a second. The faster the better. And shoot around F/2 - F2.8.

    One of the key photographic elements you want in most sports shots is subject isolation. What means an Out Of Focus background which doesn't distract from the subject. Shooting at F2 - F/2.8 goes a long way to blur out the background. Shooting from under the basket will give you a lot of distance between subject background. The longer the lens the greater the isolation. The 70-200 F/2.8 lens is a great lens for indoor sports. But if you can get under the basket, wider lenses, 50mm, 35mm, 28mm can also be effective tools shooting from low looking up and filling the frame with the subject. In all sports with a ball, puck, et al, you need the ball/puck/et al in the shot for it to be successful. (There are always exceptions.)

    On the subject of skill:
    Patience is important. Wait for the subject to fill the frame. Shoot at the peak of action, don't machinegun every dribble. Pan/follow the player as you shoot even if your movement is slight. This is especially important when shooting at lower shutter speeds, 1/250 and 1/125. Photography is a craft, the more you shoot, the better you will become (typically).
     
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  6. KmH

    KmH In memoriam Supporting Member

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    The only thing I would add to the forgoing is that if you don't have permission from those other photographers to use their photos on your blog you may be infringing on their copyrights.
     
  7. FoodiePhoto

    FoodiePhoto TPF Noob!

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    Where do I see your photos? the ones you have taken? Please add one here without linking to the full blog. It easy to see it here without leaving the forum. :)
     
  8. ronlane

    ronlane What's next? Supporting Member

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    Been there done that (Well with a Canon T3i) as I was starting out. Those entry level camera's and lenses just are cut out to handle the low light and speed of sports photography.

    As mentioned by a number of people above. I would look at fast glass and at least the Canon 7D mk ii body.

    But as @tirediron mentioned you still have to learn the game and keep shooting with the equipment that you have. It takes time to develop your skills at sports and if you want it bad enough, it will get better.
     
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  9. LCGLincle

    LCGLincle TPF Noob!

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    Yeah, I have to agree that they have a lot of experience in shooting basketball photography so they don't have a hard time getting those great sports photos and they know what to do just to get those nice action shots. I asked one sports photographer here from a sports website and he said that he's shooting sports for 3-4 years now, so he has a lot of experience and skill, and he also shoot non-sports events too.
    You're right, I guess I just have to keep on practicing, but I need to have a better telephoto lens someday so I could match their quality of their shots since my current lens' AF and quality is not that good enough... It's not good for indoor sports too with not-so-bright lighting... Not all sports arenas here are well-lit... :apologetic: :/ Thanks for responding and you look like one of the athletes that I like here! ;)

    That's one of my dream cameras (Canon 7D MK II)! :eek: Yes, I know the flow of the game of basketball, swimming and some other sports I like and play, but I guess I should keep on practicing and hopefully get better as I keep on shooting. When I'll finally have a better DSLR and telephoto lens someday, for sure my images will go up and it can do better at indoor sports venues that are not bright enough for my cheap telephoto lens and entry-level DSLR... :/ :culpability: Thanks for responding too! ;)

    Well, it's not to my full blog (or index/main site) and it's only links towards a specific blog post of mine about some of their sports photos or my sports photos. I find it better or more comfortable to link there, than to post here one by one and I apologize for that... :cold: I can PM you if you really want to see my other sports photos...
     
  10. LCGLincle

    LCGLincle TPF Noob!

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    Very-well said! ;) I agree and thank you for replying on my other thread and I apologize for the late reply. Hopefully, I'll get better someday in sports photography and also get a better gear (both DSLR and telephoto lens).

    Yes, and of course, I NEVER use flash on my sports photos since I know it will distract those players and their teammates or coach... My latest sports photos is not a bright arena / venue, so probably I need a better DLSR with higher ISO than 6400 and a faster telephoto lens w/ faster AF than my current lens... Thanks for your well-explained and detailed post! Great advices! ;)
     

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