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Wedding Questions

cdnaiphoto

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Hello all-
I have just recently booked three weddings and have not done a wedding before as the main photographer. I had a few questions-

1. Can I use a flash indoors or is that totally inappropriate?
2. If I cannot use flash should I get a low light zoom lense or maybe just use a 50 mm/f1.4?
3. Do I NEED a zoom?

Thanks for all your input-

I know many hate a post without a picture so here are a few from a session I did yesterday-feel free to comment away :)

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The more options you can bring, the better... I have used flash in a church during the wedding with no prob... your the photog, they should expect it... but it never hurts to discus things with your clients, better to find out their wants and needs before hand, instead of getting a bad review afterwords... I have never had a prob. shooting with a flash during the ceremony...

good luck.
 
Discuss the use of flash with the Church/venue owners FIRST and not the clients. Many churches will not allow the use of flash at all regardless of whether or not you're the "photog".

My standard wedding rig consists of two bodies, one with a 24-70 2.8 and the other with a 70-200 2.8. Both have flashes mounted if allowed. If you don't have two bodies and fast zooms, I would recommend renting them; they can be the difference between satisfying your clients and a lawsuit.

Flash is appropriate indoors and out; especially on bright sunny days, it can be invaluable in saving shots that would otherwise cover all ten zones in the space of six inches.

Ensure that you brief your clients beforehand if the venue restricts photography in any way (I once had to deal with a church whose policy was NO cameras... managed to get around it eventually, but it took a lot of pleading from both me and the clients).

Good luck!
 
WOW! Where to start!
You said:
"I have just recently booked three weddings and have not done a wedding before as the main photographer. I had a few questions-
1. Can I use a flash indoors or is that totally inappropriate?
2. If I cannot use flash should I get a low light zoom lense or maybe just use a 50 mm/f1.4?
3. Do I NEED a zoom?"

Flash during the actual ceremony can be forbidden to highly discouraged. It is a wedding not a light show.
Weddings are generally not done in the dark, but they can be dim. If you have a digital then the iso in auto can cope instead of the low light lens. The ultimate decision depends on how large of photos to you expect to print. I don't worry and don't have a low light lens. Huge prints can be made from mine.

Zoom is essential in my opinion. I basically did most of the last wedding on my knees in the center isle as best I could by zooming every direction. The place was so tiny and no room to maneuver. I did take a few from far left to start. A few far rear and far right but then I was mostly stuck in the middle on my knees. I remind myself that it is a wedding ceremony not a display of photographer in motion. I love a zoom.

You said "I have just recently booked three weddings and have not done a wedding before as the main photographer"

I highly suggest that you photograph any kind of ceremony at all as practice. You have one chance and one chance only. You must be on a roll. You have got to be anticipating and advancing while never falling behind. If you do it right there is a very good chance that you have no idea or recollection of what the ceremony was like. You were far too consumed by the details. i.e "can't see the forest because of the trees"

Practice by photographing a birthday party while never once directing or controlling or re-doing anything. Don't relight the candles because you missed the shot. No re-dos. You must be in position to photo the greeting of guests, the candle lighting the dressing of the birthday girl, the lighting and blowing out of candles all the while having very little idea when and where the next moment will unfold. Do any kind of fast moving and active events as practice. You have to get the rhythm down pat. As well as the usage of your equipment. Practice a lot.

Good luck
 
OP, how many weddings have you done as an assistant?
 
Sorry but I couldn't resist...

4898378844_a3f8d4dc34.jpg
 
To the OP, will you have someone there to assist you? Or are you going at it alone? I would strongly suggest having someone there to give you a hand.
 
Cdnaiphoto- I really hope you aren't scared away by our somewhat synical replies.

It's great that you have an interest in photography, and congratulations on the wedding bookings.. But while your work does show potential, there are some basic things that most people here are going to feel you should really have "down" a bit more before taking on such a huge, once in a lifetime event.

That being said... you need to speak with the pastor of the Church to find out what the limitations are. You need to scout out the venue, and you need to be as honest as possible with your clients about what to expect. If they are happy with your services, that is the important thing..But I hope you'll take advantage of some of the great advice here to help grow as a photographer and buisiness person.
 
Cdnaiphoto- I really hope you aren't scared away by our somewhat synical replies.

It's great that you have an interest in photography, and congratulations on the wedding bookings.. But while your work does show potential, there are some basic things that most people here are going to feel you should really have "down" a bit more before taking on such a huge, once in a lifetime event.

That being said... you need to speak with the pastor of the Church to find out what the limitations are. You need to scout out the venue, and you need to be as honest as possible with your clients about what to expect. If they are happy with your services, that is the important thing..But I hope you'll take advantage of some of the great advice here to help grow as a photographer and buisiness person.

I better keep quiet then ;)
 
I don't care how many others you have seen or how popular it is, the angled, off-kilter views are just not acceptable in professional work. Keep the camera level, either in the vertical or horizontal position. I get dizzy looking at them.
 

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