What are the best lenses for Canon t5 ?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by maketroli, Nov 6, 2015.

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  1. maketroli

    maketroli TPF Noob!

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    Hello, friends

    I just bought a Canon t5, I am not a pro, I just bought this camera for fun and it takes very nice pictures, it does what I want, I've been reading about this type of cameras and if you want to improve the quality of the pictures you need to buy better lenses. I am actually taking pictures of everything I see, I've been watching tutorials because I think It is not worth it to have a camera like this and use it in automatic mode all the time.

    So, I will like you to tell me about what type of lenses I can use with my camera and what are the best depending on the purpose of the picture I am taking.


     
  2. ronlane

    ronlane What's next? Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the site. This is such an open question with no exact answer. It all depends on a number of variables.

    How much are you willing/able to spend?
    How specific do you want the lens(es) to be? (How many uses you want for each)
    Do you want primes or zooms?
    What are you shooting? (I know that you said everything in sight at this point.)

    All that being said with your comments above, I think for now you would be well off with a general use lens. Something like a 24-70mm f/2.8 or a 24-70mm f/4, or a 24-105mm f/4L. If you were going with primes, I would look at the 50mm f/1.8 STM, either a 24mm or a 35mm, maybe an 85mm f/1.8 and a 100mm macro lens.
     
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  3. weepete

    weepete TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    I think the Canon 15-85mm f4.5-5.6 IS and the Sigma 17-70mm f2.8-4 OS Contemporary are two of the best walk around lenses for the crop sensor canons.
     
  4. KenC

    KenC Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    As Ron said, there really is no way to answer this question - it depends on so many things. If you can determine that you take a lot of photos around the same focal length, and you like the way they look, then a prime lens of about that focal length might be a good way to go. If it turns out you are often at one end of your zoom range or the other, then you may have a preference for either wide-angle or telephoto focal lengths and then you might try the appropriate zoom or prime. Renting or borrowing a lens is not a bad idea before committing yourself.
     
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  5. goodguy

    goodguy Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Best lenses for your Canon t5

    Canon 24-70mm 2.8 II
    Canon 70-200mm 2.8 II

    Of course these 2 lenses will set you back 4000$ but you will have the best canon zoom lenses in their range.
     
  6. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    There are plenty of lenses that a person can use to make good images with. Canon has a trio of new, relatively low-cost prime lenses,EF-S 24mm f/2.8, EF 40mm f/2.8, and EF 50mm f/1.8 STM. THe 24mm and 40mm are very compact "pancake" lenses, which do not protrude far from the front of the camera body, which makes the camera much easier to carry in a small space, like say in the main pouch of a fanny pack.

    The prime lens concept gives you one, single focal length and a lens that is optimized for one length. Fewer compromises in design. Pretty good lens speed, meaning light-gathering power of f/2.8 for the pancakes, and f/1.8 for the new 50mm lens. The thing about a prime lens is that after using it for a time, you learn its exact angle of view, plus the way it renders scenes, so it becomes pretty much second nature to be able to mentally frame up a shot using a kit made up of two, or three (or more) prime lenses. Using a prime lens for a time causes you to start to "see pictures" that a specific lens would make. It's one of the critical steps in previsualizing a photo.

    40mm on APS-C is a semi-selective angle of view. It's not a "normal lens", and it's not s telephoto lens, but rather something else entirely. It's a focal length that "sees" with an angle of view and a background compression/expansion that's kind of like the way the human eye sees things, in terms of foreground/background relationships. It's difficult to express what this focal length, 58mm to 60mm, does, but it's a length that can take many regular, everyday scenes, and extract a slice of life, and make it into a photograph that does not have a wide-angle, scale-expanding sense of near/far, nor does it have an odd, "lensy" magnification of reality effect.

    58mm to 60mm in 35mm FX-format length, or 40mm or thereabouts on APS-C, is a lens length that can be used for many types of photography: landscape, reportage,documentary, close-up, scenic, social photography, portraiture. That's why Canon offers this length in a single-length lens, because it has a place.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2015
  7. JacaRanda

    JacaRanda Hobbyist Birdographer

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    I suggest working with your kit lens until you figure out what you like to shoot and discover what limitations your lens has based on that.
     
  8. ronlane

    ronlane What's next? Supporting Member

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    What fun is that???

    What JacaRanda meant was get the 400mm f/2.8 lens, if you decide that it's not for you send it to me or him.
     
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  9. JacaRanda

    JacaRanda Hobbyist Birdographer

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    Oh yes yes yes best advice yet!
     
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  10. beagle100

    beagle100 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I want to be on the 400mm 2.8 list
     
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  11. TCampbell

    TCampbell Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Yes - be careful when you say you wan the "best" lenses. Some lenses have price tags that exceed $10k.

    The EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM II is either in everyone's camera bag OR on their wish-list. Nobody doesn't want to own that lens.

    The EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM II is extremely popular among full-frame camera owners, but on a crop-frame camera the lens doesn't offer much (if any) on the wide-angle side of things (it would be an extremely gentle wide-angle view). The crop-frame sensor equivalent for this lens is the EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM. It provides roughly the same angle of view as the 18-55mm kit lens, except it can offer f/2.8 at all focal lengths (the kit lens is f/3.5 at the short end and f/5.6 at the long end. So this lens collects four times more light and offers a shallower DoF at the long end.)

    These are all (so far) in the $1000-2000 price range. But there are some lenses that can offer some unique advantages at a much more affordable price point.

    The best bargain lens in the line-up is the EF 50mm f/1.8 STM. (the non-STM version of the same lens is just a few dollars cheaper, but avoid it... the "STM" version is much better.) The non-STM vs. STM have identical configuration of lens elements. That makes the detail resolving capability of the two lenses also identical.

    The one "obvious" difference is that one of the lenses has the STM focusing motor (almost completely silent as it focuses) whereas the non-STM lens has a very noisy and slow focus motor (so slow that it's not very useful if shooting action because the focus will probably not keep up with a fast moving subject.) STM motors focus faster (and the USM motors focus even faster still, but are not as quiet.) The non-STM version was built to be affordable so there's a lot of cheap plastic in it... a bit too cheap. The lens is somewhat easy to break. They improved the build-quality on the STM version and only barely increased the price tag (the tiny increase in price tag is WELL worth the advantages you get.)

    But the "STM" version has 7 aperture blades whereas the non-STM version only has 5. This causes points of light to de-focus into the shape of a pentagon and overlapping pentagons creates a very strange jittery effect in the background blur that isn't very pleasant. The 7-balde STM lens provides a much smoother quality to the other of focus blur. The EF 50mm f/1.4 USM has 8 blades, better build quality, collects more light, can create a shallow depth-of-field, and has a visible focus-distance indicator window on the lens (which the non-STM and STM lenses lack.) But the f/1.4 version is about $350. There's also an EF 50mm f/1.2L USM which is top-of-the-line for image quality (has a 9-balde aperture and gorgeous out-of-focus blur) but that lens is closer to $1500.

    So in terms of 50mm primes, the "STM" version is probably the best quality for your dollar (it's about $125), but if the EF 50mm f/1.4 USM version is within your budget, it is ultimately a better lens and $350 isn't an unreasonable price tag for a lens (very few quality lenses cost less than $500).

    There's a reason I bring up the 50mm and ignore the rest... it's nice to own at least one lens that can provide a low focal ratio and create a shallow depth of field. If you want to shoot portraits, this lens would be much better than anything else you've got (the EF 85mm f/1.8 USM would be even better still.) You will, from time to time, find yourself in situations where there's just not much light and having a low focal ratio lens means they collect SUBSTANTIALLY more light in the same shooting situation. An f/1.8 focal ratio pulls in approximately 10x more light than an f/5.6 lens... meaning the EF 50mm f/1.8 STM will not only have a significantly easier time shooting in low light as compared to the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 "kit" lens at the 50mm focal ratio... it'll allow you to shoot at lower ISO and/or much much faster shutter speeds.

    The 50mm will provide a slightly narrow angle of view on your camera (50mm is a mild amount of telephoto). A "normal" focal length on your camera is 28mm (the focal length that seems neither wide-angle nor telephoto). That means that if shooting indoors, you'll have to back away farther to get everything in the frame (or just include less in the frame) but you'll get shallower depth-of-field (better background blur) for doing so. There is a 28mm lens (actually two) but it's a bit more expensive. If shooting portraits, longer focal lengths are preferred anyway.

    So now, hopefully, you can appreciate why it's a good idea to own a low focal ratio prime lens (a prime lens is any lens that does not 'zoom') even if you've already got that focal length covered by another lens.
     
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  12. KmH

    KmH In memoriam Supporting Member

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    Buying better lenses will help improve the quality of the pictures a little. Improving the quality of the pictures a lot is about being a more knowledgeable and skilled photographer.

    Learning about visual image composition, light direction and quality, and the many technical aspects of doing digital photography and post production are all important aspects of being able to consistently make high quality photographs.
    Digital Photography Tutorials
     
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