Why go full frame?

slat

Been spending a lot of time on here!
Joined
Oct 1, 2016
Messages
3,594
Reaction score
1,109
Location
Missouri
Can others edit my Photos
Photos OK to edit
Why would you upgrade from an aps-c to to a full frame. What advantage or benefit do you get with say a Canon R5 vs Canon R7. The latter seems to be just as capable of a camera.
In todays mirrorless camera market are the differences much less between full frame and aps-c than in the past? Seems to be even less difference in say an R6 mark ii and the R7.
 
Why would you upgrade from an aps-c to to a full frame. What advantage or benefit do you get with say a Canon R5 vs Canon R7. The latter seems to be just as capable of a camera.
In todays mirrorless camera market are the differences much less between full frame and aps-c than in the past? Seems to be even less difference in say an R6 mark ii and the R7.
Plan to shoot my APS-C kits(Nikon+Fuji)till they break. Worrying about dying in my sleep not owning today's aspirational gear bait? Nope.
 
This seemed appropriate since you mentioned canon. APS-C vs full-frame - Canon Europe

I have a full frame Pentax K1MII, and the APS-C K3ii. Both have traits which I like and both get used regularly.
 
I like FF because I shot 35mm film for 40 years, so FF for me is much easier for my brain to process. I "upgraded" to FF from APS-C not because of the format size, but my old body was only 12MP and I wanted more, (don't we all, lol), so I went with a 45MP FF body.

I'm quite happy with it, did it make a huge difference, no I did well enough with the 12MP APS-C, but I can see an improvement on what I shoot.
 
I currently have a canon 80D and was thinking of upgrading to a mirrorless. FF seemed to be the way I wanted to go, but I don't know if there is enough difference to make the switch. I started looking at the R7 but then thought I could get the R6 mark 2 for a little more money but as I started to compare them I didn't see that the R6 mark 2 was really giving me much other than FF. So I started to consider the R5 which it does bring more to the table but is it really that much more. Would the few advantages the R5 has be that much of a difference maker?
 
I change from crop sensor to ff because I regularly do big 2m long pano’s and wanted the extra that my 600d did not have.
 
I think full frame are better for low light - although of course DXO can help - see this taken at 16000 ISO on a 7DMKII and gone through DXO


EF7A8460-CR2_DxO_DeepPRIMECockoftherock by davholla2002, on Flickr

But maybe with a R5 I could have had used a faster shutter speed which would have been useful
 
So many reasons involved, but nearly all of them revolve around a marketing gimmick created over economics and cost issues.

FF does have (in comparison related age difference that is) a higher step capability, but ONLY so far as using FF lenses over APS specific lenses.


Too many physical differences.
 
I currently have a canon 80D and was thinking of upgrading to a mirrorless. FF seemed to be the way I wanted to go, but I don't know if there is enough difference to make the switch. I started looking at the R7 but then thought I could get the R6 mark 2 for a little more money but as I started to compare them I didn't see that the R6 mark 2 was really giving me much other than FF. So I started to consider the R5 which it does bring more to the table but is it really that much more. Would the few advantages the R5 has be that much of a difference maker?
I have both (al mirrorless) and use my APS-C cameras more than the FF. Part of that is I'm just more familiar with the APS-C cameras but part is also that the FF is bigger and heavier.
FF is going to be able to record more DR and have better low-light capability. I don't need the low-light advantage and I only occasionally benefit from the extra DR advantage. Is the FF cost justified by my use? No.
 
I have a 7d, 5d, and now an R5. I shoot in FF mode with the R5 when I am not using my telephoto lens. I set it and crop it to 1.6 when using my telephoto lens. It gives me an extra few hundred mm.
 
I set it and crop it to 1.6 when using my telephoto lens. It gives me an extra few hundred mm.

This has always been somewhat confusing to wrap my brain around. I finally settled on staying in full frame mode. My understanding of crop mode on a full frame with a full frame lens is that nothing changes, except FOV, the DOF, Exposure, focal length remain the same, as you're simply cropping away part of your sensor. There's no difference between an image shot in crop mode vs cropping post. Staying in FF mode gives me the wiggle room around the sides to crop later to fit the aspect ratio of the final print.
 
I think this is all a trap designed by camera companys to get people to up grade spending a ton of money to do it! And the end result is you do get a picture and maybe even as good as with your old camera!

I see your an American. Well we have a huge head problem here. We are never satified with anything if we think there's better out there. Ends up we spend a lot of time chashing out own tail! Me, I'm american with Polish roots! I wouldn't know better if it hit me in the face! ;-)
 
Last edited:
Age old debate, Ansel Adams used an 8 inch by 10 inch format. Doubt he could get what he did with either FF or APS-C 35mm.

All depends on what do you want from your images, highest detail possible, or grain/pixels don’t matter?
 
The R5 is appealing to me from the stand point of full frame, low light and MP. But if I wanted to save a bit of money and buy some glass would the better choice be a R6 mark ii or the R7. I like the that the R5 had so many MP that way if I needed to crop something I would still have a reasonable amount of MP to work with, The R6 has the same MP as my current 80D in FF but way less in crop mode or to crop. Then the R7 seems to be more appealing. Any thoughts?
 
Going from the Canon 70D to the 5Dmarkiii was a big jump with higher ISO with less noise. Going from the 5DmarkIII to the R6 was a big jump for eye tracking. I like the Canon for portraits. The FujiXT-5 I like for travel and walking around type camera. You have to decide what features you want that best fits your shooting needs.
 

Most reactions

Back
Top