ISO?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Tolyk, Aug 12, 2006.

  1. Tolyk

    Tolyk TPF Noob!

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    Does anyone have any rules of thumb for when to use different ISO film (or settings on a D SLR)

    I'm new to using film and really don't know what I'm doing *chuckle*
     
  2. darin3200

    darin3200 TPF Noob!

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    Use iso 100 when outdoors mostly. 400 for outdoors and indoors depending on how big your lens f/stop is. 800 more for inside, action. 1600+ for really low light, fast action.
     
  3. Tiberius

    Tiberius TPF Noob!

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    The rule I follow for ISO is as follows:

    Use the lowest possible ISO that will allow you to use the shutter speeds you need.

    If you need reasonably fast shutter speeds to avoid hand or subject blur and need to bump the ISO up to 800 in a low-light environment, then do so. But if you can get away with 200 or 100, definitely do so.
     
  4. LWW

    LWW TPF Noob!

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    Yep. +1.

    LWW
     
  5. bigfatbadger

    bigfatbadger TPF Noob!

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    I tend to use 400 most of the time, T Max 400 is fairly low grain and the extra speed means tha I don't have to worry about film stock halfway through shooting.
     
  6. Tolyk

    Tolyk TPF Noob!

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    Okay.. better question :p When do you know what speed to use *grin* I'm new to SLRs.. used only a digital point and shoot prior to this.
     
  7. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The rule of thumb for shutter speed, is to use a shutter speed that is faster than the your focal length. For example, if your lens is 50mm...then you want to use a shutter speed that is faster than 1/50. If you lens is 300mm, then you will want to use a shutter speed of 1/300 or faster.

    This rule of thumb is for when you are shooting with the camera in your hands...to reduce blur caused by camera shake. Everyone is different, some people can stay steady at slower speeds and some need even faster speeds.

    If you are using a tripod and a remote, then you would not have to worry about camera shake.

    So back to your original question, keep the ISO a low as possible, unless your shutter speed is not fast enough, then turn it up if you have to.
     
  8. Tolyk

    Tolyk TPF Noob!

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    What's the purpose of being able to control the ISO settings on a 35mm SLR? I mean, isn't that determined by the type of film you put in? When should you override that? And what kind of effect does it have ? (I know I should just try it, but I've been busy :p )
     
  9. darin3200

    darin3200 TPF Noob!

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    Film only sets the camera iso speed if it's DX coded. Most film is but some isn't.

    You can override it which goes into push and pull processing. Let's say it's a sunny day and you only have 400 speed film, you could tell the camera it's 100 which would then over-expose it. To compensate for that you under-develop.

    Or it's really dark so you under-expose your film by shooting it at 800, 1600 or 3200. You can then develop in longer to compenate for less light hitting the film. The results tend to have more grain and contrast.

    You can usually push or pull 1 stop (one iso speed) with color negative film because it is very forgiving. But color film doesn't push or pull that well. It's more of a B&W thing. I often shoot 400 speed film at 3200
     
  10. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    That's right.

    Overriding the ISO on a film camera will mean that you are over or underexposing. Exposure compensation is basically the same thing.

    I think people most often over ride the ISO setting because they know the specific film they are using and know that how it will perform when under or over exposed. For example, one of the most popular slide films is/was Velvia 50. A lot of people like to override the ISO to 40.
     
  11. OVR

    OVR TPF Noob!

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    take some films... the same brand and model... take one with 100ISO one with 200ISO and one with 400ISO... compare and you will learn more...
     
  12. Cuervo79

    Cuervo79 Guest

    try tu push or pull the film only as a last resort. when you push a roll it has to be from the start, because the developer will use a diferent method to develope a pushed/pulled film, you cant take some pictures at iso100 and then push it to 400, the one hundred ones will be "ruined". Also don't expect results the same as properly exposing a photo when pushing or pulling film, you sacrifice quality in order to get the picture...

    Now in digital you can pull that off, you can take some pictures at iso 200, go up to 1600 then go down to 100 with no problem.
     

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