B&W Photo Restoration

Discussion in 'Graphics Programs and Photo Gallery' started by Fraggo, Apr 7, 2009.

  1. Fraggo

    Fraggo TPF Noob!

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    Unfortunally, it is not the scanner, it's the photo. The orginal print is from at least the mid '60's. I have been able to get his tie pretty good, still just messing with his face.


     
  2. Dwig

    Dwig TPF Noob!

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    Odd, the blotches in the posted image bear no resemblance to grain in a print. If it is true grain in the print that is triggering the blotchiness in the scan, the problem is the settings in the scanner software or performance limits in that particular scanner. A properly made scan, with a decently high quality scanner, of a print that shows true grain from the original negative will resolve the grain in the scanned image. It woun't be blotchy.

    Does the original scanned image look just like the posted image, or did you post a downsample version that became blotchy when the downsampling handled the grain poorly?
     
  3. Fraggo

    Fraggo TPF Noob!

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    The only diference between that photo and the orginial, is the background.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2009
  4. Dwig

    Dwig TPF Noob!

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    Then the problem with the print is not grain. It has some form of deterioration and the only recourse is retouching using the techniques mentioned in several of the other replys.

    Still, it does look very much like the interence pattern that results from having the scan resolution too near the spatial frequency of the grain. That can easily occur and when it does, the cure is to rescan at either a much higher resolution or at a lower resolution.
     

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