CC , portraits of my son with my new lights

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by k.tremblay1, Mar 1, 2012.

  1. k.tremblay1

    k.tremblay1 TPF Noob!

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    I got to practice some more tonight! Ok this time I put one light right next to my camera to the right, about 4 feet from subject and then the other light to the left of me a little higher than camera level and about 5 feet from subject. I noticed though that there was 2 catch lights in each of his eyes, is this normal? I took a few photos like this, and then ended up switching the left light to right next to him and way above him (a hair light I think??). Anyways, I need all the help i can get! I have already learned so much and I've only been a member of this forum for less than a week. Thank you all soooo much!!

    Also, what do you suggest for backdrops? I am using 2 muslin backdrops, white and black, and then a large piece of felt for the blue. The muslin wrinkles soooo bad no matter what i do! A few of these photos I had to dodge and burn to hide the wrinkles. But I am trying to find a material where I won't have to edit like this but not too expensive. Thanks!

    1. This is one with the light above him to the left and then one directly in front of him.
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    IMG_5265 by k.tremblay1, on Flickr

    2.
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    IMG_5221 by k.tremblay1, on Flickr

    3. Background was dodged in this one, can you tell?
    [​IMG]
    IMG_5206 by k.tremblay1, on Flickr

    4. This is the one with 2 catch lights, it doesn't look "normal" to me...
    [​IMG]
    IMG_5187 by k.tremblay1, on Flickr


     
  2. kundalini

    kundalini Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    That is what is causing the "flat lighting" look. By having a light on either side you are canceling out any shadows (depth). Try having your Fill light on the same side as your Main light, but only a maximum of 18" off lens axis.

    Yes
    I would remove the catch light at 12:00 in post. Sometimes a second catch light does work, but mostly they are at ~6:00.
     
  3. Carny

    Carny No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    It took me a minute to figure out in the first one that that is his shoe behind his head. Looked like a mullet or rat tail or something for a minute.
     
  4. g-fi

    g-fi TPF Noob!

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    Do you steam your muslin before you use it? I have an inexpensive hand steamer that I run over fabric backdrops after setting them up to take the wrinkles out. Depending on the material, that Downy "wrinkle releaser" works well too. Of course, you're not going to get perfectly smooth unless you're using a material that doesn't wrinkle or show wrinkles, like velvet. Paper seamless is the way to go, it's inexpensive and when it gets dirty or wrinkled, it's just a matter of pulling it down and trimming it. You can also DIY your own backgrounds using wallpaper/plywood/base trim and a wood flooring sample or rug/carpet remnant.

    #3 is a crazycakes expression, but probably the best lit out of all of them, see the shadows you're creating on his face? Google lighting set ups, there are some great websites with illustrations of where to place your lights to generate certain shadow patterns. I'm too lazy this morning to Google them for you lol. When you're starting out with lighting, it's tempting to fall into the ERASE ALL TEH SHADOWS! mindset, but shadow and contouring with your lights is what creates dynamic and interesting portraits. You don't necessarily want to light "evenly", you want to light "well". Have fun!
     

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