DX and FX

Discussion in 'Nikon Lenses' started by nikon_peter, Apr 24, 2019.

  1. nikon_peter

    nikon_peter TPF Noob!

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    G’day, just wondering, do all FX lenses work on. DX camera D7200?
    Thank you



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  2. Dave442

    Dave442 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    The best bet is to look at the Nikon compatibility list for the FX lenses. Some, like the Tilt-Shift lenses, have some limitations - but the vast majority will work.
     
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  3. nikon_peter

    nikon_peter TPF Noob!

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  4. ac12

    ac12 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Watch some of the new lenses.
    I think there are some compatibility issues with the AF-P lenses on the D7200, even with the latest firmware.
     
  5. nikon_peter

    nikon_peter TPF Noob!

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  6. Strodav

    Strodav TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    I saw a video-blog today on You Tube by Tony Northrup titled 20Things Most Photographers Get Wrong - Item 10 (Author: How to Create Stunning Digital Photography) where he said that at least some high quality FX lenses are optimized for full frame sensors and are not as sharp on DX bodies. He did not make a strong argument, but repeated the experience of another professional he knows. I'm not sure I believe it, but Tony is a fairly thoughtful guy. Another train of thought is that you are only using the center, usually the highest sharpness part of the lens, so you should get at least equal sharpness between the FX and DX body.

    My first dslr was a D7200 followed by a D500. I bought a couple of DX lenses then started picking up FX glass knowing I would eventually buy a FF body. I recently acquired a D800 followed by a D850. I really can't see any difference in IQ between my FX and DX bodies using the same FX glass like a Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 and Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2019
  7. adamhiram

    adamhiram No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I remember reading/watching that a while back as well, but for the most part don't find that to be the case. A good place to see some detailed testing is at DxOMark, which gives a "perceptual megapixels" rating, as well as an overall score, although there's really no substitute for just comparing for yourself at a local camera store. In most cases the FX lens is just a better lens., and in general I've found that Nikon's more "professional" lenses are mostly full frame, with greater sharpness, faster and more accurate focusing, and overall nicer rendering.

    That being said, FX lenses tend to be bigger, heavier, and zooms often aren't the best range for DX cameras. Some of the best lens advice I got when I was starting out was to buy glass for the camera I have, not the one I want - I can always trade up later. For example, a 24-70 might have been sharper and more future-proof than a 17-55, but I would have also missed out on the wider range and been carrying around a much heavier lens for no reason.
     
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  8. ac12

    ac12 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    And if you never end up getting a FX camera, you bought the upgrade path for no future benefit.
    It turns out that rather than going up to FX, I went down to m4/3, to get a smaller lighter kit.
    I may yet get a FX camera, but with the m4/3 kit, the likelihood of getting a FX camera has dropped significantly.

    One issue with DX lenses is that there are standard FX lenses which are missing from the DX line, like a DX equivalent of the 70-200/2.8 (a 45-135). So you are forced to adapt to the nearest FX lens, and deal with the miss-match of coverage due to the different format sizes. My options were 70-200 or 24-120, I went with the 70-200, though I do miss giving up on the short end, and there are days when I wish I got the 24-120 instead.
    Sigma did make a 50-150/2.8, but discontinued it for the shorter and faster 50-100/1.8.
     
  9. Zen1300

    Zen1300 TPF Noob!

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    The bigger issue is the other direction. I had a D7100 and upgraded to the D750. I had all FX lenses except for one, a Sigma 10-20mm. I guess I didn't realize it was a DX lens when I bought it. I can still use it, but I have to put my D750 into DX-crop mode to avoid the vignetting.
     
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  10. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Prism overhang in an issue with a very few Nikon bodies, and mostly the PC-Nikkors....this is a fairly rare issue
     
  11. Solarflare

    Solarflare No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    1. Do not listen to Northrup. Also not to Rockwell and other clueless people like that.

    2. Absolutely nothing stops you from using DX lenses on FX in FX mode. Sure you will get a vignette, it is after all a DX lens. Maybe even the corners will get completely dark. So what ? Having a vignette is a pleasant, often desired effect that people intentionally add in post production. You can also stop the lens down or use a different aspect ratio to reduce the effect. Really nothing forces you to having to use DX mode, which is why I disable that mode completely on my full frame cameras.

    3. Using a FX lens on DX is even less of a problem. First of all, FX lenses in general are more expensive, but also better than DX lenses. So if anyone complaints that a FX lens isnt as good on crop sensor as it is on full frame sensors, then the question is, what other lens would offer better performance, anyway ? Also modern full frame cameras like the D850 have basically as small pixels as current crop cameras. And crop cameras use only the best potion of a lens, which is why many FX lenses actually work better on crop sensors.
     
  12. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    Some DX lenses will cover an FX sensor quite nicely. The 35/1.8 does well when stopped down.
     

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