First gallery showing...need help on presentation

foundationeer

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How is everyone? New to the entire process of having a piece of mine show in a gallery. I'm not sure how to go about it. How should I have it printed? On canvas, metal, gallery wrapped, another type of backing? Also, it will be for sale, so the gallery and I will each take a 50/50% split. What does anyone think about pricing?
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foundationeer

foundationeer

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OK, great. Thank you so much!!
 

vintagesnaps

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In my experience guidelines are given. Most of the time it's a black wood or metal frame, matted in white (or maybe off white). Depends on the exhibit. Black frame, white mat is what came to mind for this photo. Oh, and printed on nice quality paper. I've gotten sample packs so I could try various weights and textures since I mostly print my own.

I started out going to exhibits and art fairs etc. and noticing the pricing. Now if I'm shipping it to another city I check out the gallery's website (since if they're selling framed or matted prints there usually are prices given) to get an idea if it varies much from where I live. Usually there seems to be a range, and more established or well known local or regional photographers price at the high end of the range. Varies with the size to some extent too.

Try looking up Lumiere in Rochester NY (there's another Lumiere in another city). They did have a video on how to hinge a print to a mat (which is so easy to do, just buy some hinging tape and watch the video to learn how to do it). There are different types of hinging tape if you try that method (I use the self adhesive not the gummed).
 
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foundationeer

foundationeer

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In my experience guidelines are given. Most of the time it's a black wood or metal frame, matted in white (or maybe off white). Depends on the exhibit. Black frame, white mat is what came to mind for this photo. Oh, and printed on nice quality paper. I've gotten sample packs so I could try various weights and textures since I mostly print my own.

I started out going to exhibits and art fairs etc. and noticing the pricing. Now if I'm shipping it to another city I check out the gallery's website (since if they're selling framed or matted prints there usually are prices given) to get an idea if it varies much from where I live. Usually there seems to be a range, and more established or well known local or regional photographers price at the high end of the range. Varies with the size to some extent too.

Try looking up Lumiere in Rochester NY (there's another Lumiere in another city). They did have a video on how to hinge a print to a mat (which is so easy to do, just buy some hinging tape and watch the video to learn how to do it). There are different types of hinging tape if you try that method (I use the self adhesive not the gummed).


WOW. Thank you so much for the info. It really narrowed down the list of things I have been worried about.
 

PersistentNomad

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Having run a gallery, I agree that talking to the curator or gallery director is best. Different regions have different popular standards and they will advise what they are looking for. But, don't be surprised if they aren't willing to speculate the price for you. Some galleries have a strict "you set it" policy and they won't even make a suggestion.

However, having worked in galleries in three different regions of the country now, here are some trends I've noticed. People who buy photos don't spend on photos. The most popular price points are $50-$125, regardless of size. Strange, I know. Buyers also tend to gravitate toward ones that have an air of mystery, like when they are printed on aluminum or canvas. I think it makes them feels like they are getting something more fancy than it is, somehow, like it's *almost* a painting. If you want to sell, don't go big. Unless the region you are showing in is filled with McMansions, don't make anything bigger than 16x20. People have limited wall real estate for art, and they buy based on that.

As for mechanical advice, put a secure wire on the back. I freaking hate it when artists bring in a frame with glass and the thinnest, cheapest wire that isn't even knotted to the screw-eye that's barely secured in the wood of the frame. I have yelled at artists for it before. If you need help, go to Michael's have them do it for $5 and watch them so you can learn.
There are different types of hinging tape if you try that method (I use the self adhesive not the gummed).
Filmoplast P-90 is the bomb-diggity of hinging tapes for photos. Linen tape and the like is for heavier duty materials.

Lastly, congrats on being included in a gallery show!! That's a super big achievement that many artists never come to know, so be proud and keep putting your work out there.
 
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foundationeer

foundationeer

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Having run a gallery, I agree that talking to the curator or gallery director is best. Different regions have different popular standards and they will advise what they are looking for. But, don't be surprised if they aren't willing to speculate the price for you. Some galleries have a strict "you set it" policy and they won't even make a suggestion.

However, having worked in galleries in three different regions of the country now, here are some trends I've noticed. People who buy photos don't spend on photos. The most popular price points are $50-$125, regardless of size. Strange, I know. Buyers also tend to gravitate toward ones that have an air of mystery, like when they are printed on aluminum or canvas. I think it makes them feels like they are getting something more fancy than it is, somehow, like it's *almost* a painting. If you want to sell, don't go big. Unless the region you are showing in is filled with McMansions, don't make anything bigger than 16x20. People have limited wall real estate for art, and they buy based on that.

As for mechanical advice, put a secure wire on the back. I freaking hate it when artists bring in a frame with glass and the thinnest, cheapest wire that isn't even knotted to the screw-eye that's barely secured in the wood of the frame. I have yelled at artists for it before. If you need help, go to Michael's have them do it for $5 and watch them so you can learn.
There are different types of hinging tape if you try that method (I use the self adhesive not the gummed).
Filmoplast P-90 is the bomb-diggity of hinging tapes for photos. Linen tape and the like is for heavier duty materials.

Lastly, congrats on being included in a gallery show!! That's a super big achievement that many artists never come to know, so be proud and keep putting your work out there.



Thank you so much!! For the advice and the kind words. Definitely narrowed down my list of concerns.
 

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