Smart phone taking better pics than Canon EOS T5

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by codyj, Feb 18, 2020.

  1. Sharpshooterr

    Sharpshooterr No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2019
    Messages:
    280
    Likes Received:
    73
    Location:
    NorCal, North Bay, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Probably directed at mine but I certainly don’t see why?!?! LoL
    SS


     
  2. SquarePeg

    SquarePeg hear me roar Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Messages:
    12,099
    Likes Received:
    9,268
    Location:
    Boston
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Keep it civil please.
     
  3. Soocom1

    Soocom1 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Messages:
    2,905
    Likes Received:
    1,263
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Ok.. Back to the OP.

    If you can, post the metadata of both photos.
    This will help determine the way the cameras recorded the images.
     
  4. codyj

    codyj TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2020
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I'm not sure what the camera was set at but since I've been making adjustments I believe I upped the picture value to 12mb.

    On the way back from Las Vegas I'll stop in Death Valley again and take some more snaps.

    If I'm not impressed with the camera it's going back b/c my smart phone seems to take some pretty good pics

     
  5. davholla

    davholla No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2015
    Messages:
    854
    Likes Received:
    383
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. wfooshee

    wfooshee No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2014
    Messages:
    637
    Likes Received:
    178
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Don't confuse "wide angle" with "aspect ratio."

    If you look at the images, the Canon is showing you a wider view of the mountains, even though the aspect ratio is narrower. The picture's not "wide," but the scene is farther away, and thus has more of the landscape in it.

    "Wide angle" simply means the field of view of the lens, not the ratio of the presented image. A shorter focal length is referred to as a wide-angle view.

    And a powershot is not a dSLR. It's a digital camera, but not a single-lens reflex, i.e. interchangeable lenses, viewfinder shows the scene through the lens.

    Your original question applies to the aspect ratio of the image, not the actual scene, because the Canon's scene is "wider" then the phone's; more mountains are shown.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. weepete

    weepete TPF Supporters Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2011
    Messages:
    5,661
    Likes Received:
    2,137
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    What do you mean by better?

    To me the Canon shot looks like the blues in the sky are exposed better and the mountains are less blotchy with more detail. But there are other issues with this shot, a terrible amount of atmospheric haze, poor lighting and the composition could be better as well. The latter three are more of an issue than any difference in quality between these two shots.
     
  8. Soocom1

    Soocom1 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Messages:
    2,905
    Likes Received:
    1,263
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Looking closer, the Canon looks better to me.


    but thats just me.
     
  9. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    48,229
    Likes Received:
    18,867
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
     
  10. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    48,229
    Likes Received:
    18,867
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Would love to hear about the "added PSI" and cameras imploding. Adding "lol" to outrageous, ridiculous claims does not excuse the behavior, and this is the second time in recent memory that the respondent has alleged that other people here like to spout "bullshit"claims. There is a place for deadpan and sarcasm, but when you start throwing around claims like "bullshit" I think it is time to put a stop to the behavior.

    It is pretty clear that the experience level of the OP might make it impossible for him to discern serious from joking claims.

    Welcome to whatever forum this is?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. TWX

    TWX No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2019
    Messages:
    410
    Likes Received:
    103
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Warning, wall of text incoming.

    So as far as taking landscape shots, I'm not terribly experienced myself, but what I have concluded is that when you're trying to do landscapes with atmospheric haze, the aperture of the lens and the shutter speed matter quite a lot, and additionally because of the large and high resolution sensor, optical problems with a lens will be more pronounced than on the tiny sensor in a phone or point-and-shoot.

    I'm still working-out how to snap good landscapes, but I've found narrow (high number) apertures, low ISO settings, and slow shutter speeds provide me with the best results for good color reproduction, better than I can get with a cell phone camera. Additionally if I shoot in a RAW format, I can use software to adjust the thresholds for shadows and for highlights along with mid-range brightness and colors, to further reduce the effects of atmospheric haze.

    So it's possible that a cell phone camera, out of the box on automatic, compared against a DSLR right out of the box will take better pictures. On the other hand, that DSLR, or mirrorless, or bridge camera, or even some of the higher-end compact cameras will produce better results when the photographer learns how to control the exposure manually or semi-manually and stops taking photos on automatic or programmed-automatic settings.

    The Canon T5, also called the 1200D in other markets, has a "basic mode" setting on the main dial that looks like a pair of mountains. My assumption is that this setting will attempt to change the priority of aperture, ISO, and shutter speed to something more like what an experienced photographer would select when trying to take landscape shots. Now, that said, the results delivered are still going to depend on the lighting conditions and atmospheric conditions at the time. If the lighting is excessively bright and harsh then it may be difficult for the camera to automatically select a slow shutter speed if simply too much light is coming in even at ISO 100 and even at something like f/11. On the other hand, if you take some shots in this mode, like what you see, and use some software to look at the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO that the camera chose, you could use those settings on "M" for manual mode to see if you can produce the kinds of images you like, or if varying those settings a bit one way or the other improves the results. In a nutshell that's what I'm doing as I attempt to teach myself.

    The harder part, for me at least, is all of the aesthetic parts of "composing", ie, picking out my subject and finding the best angle, the best distance from the subject, determining how wide I want the shot to be around the subject, what I want out of the rest of the scene for the background, and other framing issues. To me that's the real challenge, I can point a camera in a direction and get the exposure to be acceptable, but taking a picture of something worth looking at is another matter.

    Part of the reason I mentioned that the T5 is also the 1200D, is so that if you should want to look up tutorials on using your camera, you can reference non-north-American tutorials too.

    As far as aspect ratio, I suggest using the camera's native aspect ratio for still photography. The sensor is being exposed whether or not you're saving the data with the original photos or not, and if you can always crop in-software later if you don't want the top or bottom of an image. I would rather have that information, as sometimes I find some hidden little gem in it that I might enjoy looking at versus what I intended as my subject, or I find that some part gives more context to the photo.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Dao

    Dao No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    6,423
    Likes Received:
    462
    Location:
    St. Louis


    LG Stylo 2 V VS835 cell phone
    F/2.2
    3.5mm (not sure what is the 35mm eq focal length)
    1/2747
    iso 50
    Exposure Mode - Auto
    White Balance - Auto
    Center-weight avg meter mode
    Scene capture type - Standard


    Canon PowerShot SX530 HS
    f/5.0
    4.3mm (based on Canon website, 35mm film equivalent is 24mm for 4.3mm focal length)
    1/1000
    iso 100
    Exposure Mode - Auto
    White Balance - Auto
    Multi-segment meter mode
    Scene Capture type - Standard

    Based on the above data, both were shot with auto mode and the only thing I can see the different is the optics, the photo sensor and the pre-defined POST processing algorithm for Standard Scene in Auto mode. The Canon Powershot camera did show some softness at the corner area. If the camera allow manual or aperture priority mode, I will stop it down a little to f/5.6 to f/8 and see if that helps. (i.e. Set to aperture priority mode and dial the aperture to f/5.6 or f/8). That of course will lower the shutter speed which I do not think will have any impact on the photo.

    Both photos lack of contrast (primary I think was related to the environment/location), you can try to switch to a different shooting Scene mode and see if that make a different next time. Otherwise, I will increase the contrast of the photo and see. The cell phone photo does appear to be a little sharper in the foreground, and that could be more aggressive sharpening applied to the photo.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2020
    • Like Like x 1

Share This Page