Softball picture

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by skt4271, Apr 21, 2018.

  1. skt4271

    skt4271 TPF Noob!

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    Well my first time shooting a game today, what I learned is its hard. I'm not allowed on the field so all the pictures have to be taken outside the fence. I find most of the pictures are of the same position. Any other tips of position?

    [​IMG]


     
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  2. pinecone81

    pinecone81 TPF Noob!

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    I know exactly how you feel. I take pictures at my son's little league games and I mostly have to shoot through the fence, depending on the field. I can sometimes shoot from the dugout, but that also depends on the field. Today I was shooting from behind homeplate with my 50mm 1.8, just far enough back from the players to capture about 3/4' s of them. I also shoot with my 18-135, depending on the light and distance.

    Just move around the backstop and the outfield, depending on your lens range.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
     
  3. skt4271

    skt4271 TPF Noob!

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    I have a 70-300 I was using all day. But if I shoot from back stop, will my 18-55 be good enough?

    My setting I used was 1/1000 f4.5 with auto ISO.
     
  4. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    There are a number of different locations where you can shoot through the fencing. if you get the lens front VERY close to the chain link, you can throw it out of focus,and it will not show up. Consider the third base area, and the first base area, and also behind home plate,and to the left and right of the home plate backstop fencing.

    Here's a gallery of college baseball pictures I shot one afternoon using a fixed focal length 300mm lens on an FX-format Nikon. MANY of these were shot through the home plate backstop, but some were shot from the low-level seats along the first baseline area.

    Corban vs Antelope Valley by Derrel

    You are right to keep the shutter speed high. 1/1000 second will freeze most baseball/softball movement. Using AUTO ISO makes a lot of sense to me as well. From close distances, the 18-55 will give you focal lengths shot enough to show the total athlete from head to toe.

    For getting the backstop's chain link to NOT show up, keep the lens close to the fence, or shoot literally through the holes in the chainlink,with the lens hood pressed right up to the chainlink fencing. If the lens is even a foot back, the chain can show with short focal length lenses. With a long focal length lens setting, the chain link will tend to be thrown out of focus more so than it will with a short focal length.

    I seldom shoot baseball or softball; the above game was the first one I had shot in literally years. The more games you shoot, the better you will get! Seriously, knowing where the next play/out is going to be makes softball an easier sport to shoot than say, soccer, where the action is erratic and can move all over the field at a second's notice. Keep at it, and after a few games you will be getting better and better photos, I know it!
     
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  5. skt4271

    skt4271 TPF Noob!

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    I have the tulip hood that I did press tight on the fence. I figured my lens would be safe and uses as a pivot point.

    Ok so the 18-55 lens sounds Like something I'll try next time. I was Just worried I might missed some good long shots at 2nd base.
     
  6. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    The game is fairly predictable as for what will happen at each position/play. For instance; getting the batter, catcher, and umpire all looking at where the pitch is starting, you get three subjects with their faces turned toward the camera. Wait for the optimal moment when the pitch is in the air and you get expressions on them.

    Unfortunately, you will probably get only one player whose face is turned toward the camera at a base, but they're still good shots. The pitcher is a good subject also because you know where she is, and when she exhibits the most emotion.

    Try to mix it up a bit; get the batter's box from the front, then move over to get it from the side. Still good photos from that angle. Behind the backstop is good because you can get not only the pitcher, but you can also get the OOF figures at the plate in the same shot.

    Don't forget to keep looking around so you catch the on-deck circle, the dugouts, the fans, and coaches. Many excellent photos in all those places.

    Yes, you'll need to keep moving around, but it beats standing in one spot all afternoon and missing 2/3 of your shots.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2018
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  7. ac12

    ac12 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    It depends on the setup of the field.
    Here are my positions.
    • The fence behind the catcher, if not blocked by a wood panel.
    • The fence behind the catcher, but to the side or above the wood panel.
    • At the far end of the dugouts, where there is no fence. IF it is OK with the officials.
    • At the outfield fence, looking down the right foul line.
    • Outside the outfield fence, on the hill side, or a stool to let me see above the outfield fence.
    • Dugout shots, if you can get into the dugout, or can see into the dugout.
      • Where I shoot, the dugout is an enclosed cage, so you have to enter the dugout cage to get the dugout shots. That requires prior discussion with and approval from the coach.
    This is not a secret. Like any sport, during practice or even with no game playing, get your camera and lenses and walk all around the field looking for places to shoot from, and angles. Sometimes it takes shooting many games to get the hang of it, and what to look for. Then certain shooting positions become more interesting. I like shooting at practice, cuz I can work out shots in a non-game situation.
    AND, if you are in with the coach, you can do setup shots that you just cannot shoot during a game. Just be very careful, because when you are on the field, you are now without the protection of the protective fence. And in practice, there are MANY balls flying around.

    As was said, do not just plant yourself in one place. You may loose some shots by moving, but you also gain different shots.

    To shoot from beyond outfield
    • You will need a LONG lens. I use a 75-300 on a DX body (that is 450mm FX/FF equiv), and that is sometimes not long enough. And you will want/need a monopod or stabilized lens for those long shots. If you have a large/heavy lens, you really want to use a monopod, or your arm may/will hurt from hold the lens up for so long.
    • If the field does not have an outfield fence, you will need to talk to the refs about where you can go. When I was in high school, I was told to "get out of the outfield," even though I was so far back that no one could hit that far.
    On a 7 inning game, I usually do 3 innings around infield, 2 or 3 innings outside the outfield fence, then the final 1 or 2 innings around infield.
    One of my final shots is the scoreboard with the final score.

    WARNING:
    Do NOT "press" the hood against the fence.
    If a foul ball hits the fence near you, the fence will be shoved back towards you hard and fast. And if the camera is on the fence, the camera will be hit by the fence, and shoved back into your face. And that impact could damage the lens.
    I try to look through the fence near a post, where the post limits the backwards movement of the fence.​
    Do NOT put your fingers through the fence
    On a foul ball, the ball is into the fence so fast that I cannot react before it hits the fence.
    If your finger is where the ball hits, well . . .​
    If you are shooting outside the protective fence, you NEED to keep an eye on the ball, so that you do not get hurt.
    Always have an escape route.

    gud luk, and have fun
     
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  8. ac12

    ac12 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    As Derrel said, SHOOT, SHOOT and SHOOT more.
    Like playing a sport, the more you shoot the better you get at it. You figure out the plays, timing, angles, etc.
     
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  9. skt4271

    skt4271 TPF Noob!

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    Ok thanks guys, next one is this weekend. I'll be more mobile.
     
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  10. skt4271

    skt4271 TPF Noob!

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. beagle100

    beagle100 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    OK, so now you're more "mobile" .... but possibly with some exposure issues

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. skt4271

    skt4271 TPF Noob!

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    The darker pic is before i set the ISO on auto.

    The second pic, I believe the dark spot pin the right is the fence blurred.

    Id love to get a crisp shot like yours.
     

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