D5300 vs D7000

Discussion in 'Nikon Cameras' started by Giwpanski, Jan 1, 2016.

  1. Giwpanski

    Giwpanski TPF Noob!

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    I am between the D5300 and the D7000, obviously. My budget is up to 700€ I have found a used D7000 with 80.000 clicks with 500€. Please help me decide. I want it for both photography and video. Thanks in advance.


     
  2. jaomul

    jaomul Been spending a lot of time on here!

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  3. goodguy

    goodguy Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    80K clicks on the D7K vs a brand new camera ?
    D5300 in my eyes is the easy winner here

    D5300

    1.Its new vs 80K
    2.New tech sensor
    3.More resolution
    4.New processor
    5.Flip screen is nice if you like it (not a bit deal to me).
    6.Better in lower light
    7.No AA filter

    D7K has 3 main advantages

    1.Second control wheel
    2.In body AF motor
    3.Better build body

    I would take the D5300 over a new D7000 let alone such an old one with 80K clicks.
     
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  4. ruifo

    ruifo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    D5300, or save a bit more for a D7100
     
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  5. SCraig

    SCraig Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    To each their own but I'd never trade my D7000 (or D7100) for a D5300.
     
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  6. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Especially for an an aging, 80,000-click D7000. Nikon has been improving the viewfinder magnification on the 3xxx and 5xxx series with the newer iterations, to make the finder image a bit better and bigger. The flippy screen, and the newer imaging pipeline and better sensor makes the D5300 seem more-attractive to me as well, against the D7000.

    The D7000 was a camera that had a kind of dismal owner experience rating...a sort of hit or miss reputation; this has happened a few times, at generational breaks in d-slr design. SOme D7000 owners were happy; many were, but many were NOT!

    At times a more-mature camera from a lower price category IS BETTER than a higher-priced camera that came from an earlier era. It's difficult to figure out what camera might be best for what customer, and in some markets around the world, it seems that the official import practices and value-added taxation, etc, have kept prices SKY-high, even on used gear.
     
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  7. SCraig

    SCraig Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    In my opinion your line that states "It's difficult to figure out what camera might be best for what customer" is very important. Not everyone needs, or wants, a high-end camera body and it's important for everyone to decide what is best for them.

    My D7000 and D7100 produce the level of image quality that I desire. I seldom shoot in low light so low-light performance is not an issue for me (if it were I'd consider a full-frame body). Both of my current bodies have plenty of resolution. They also have better weather sealing than a D5xxx, a built-in Commander mode for flash, built-in autofocus motor, no "Menu Diving" to change important settings, etc.

    I agree that in many instances a newer version of a lower grade body is better in some respects but at the same time one has to look at the complete set of features and decide what is best for them. For me that's the D7xxx series. I'm more than happy with what I have and will stick with it for the foreseeable future.
     
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  8. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    I used to sell cameras and video cameras at retail when I was a kid. I was typically the #1 or #2 salesman out of a chain of 13 regional stores every month. I have sold cameras to many, many people. I helped people select the right camera setups back in the days when there were Nikon, Canon, and Minolta AF SLR's competing for the higher end, and Olympus, Pentax, and Nikon all competing fiercely in the 28-90 or 28-105 type all-in-one zoom camera segment. Although the time was different, the retail camera buyer still has the same basic constraints and concerns: brand awareness/prejudices/opinions/habit, budget, system-locked-in or not?, personal preference, size, and weight, status, social pressures.

    Buying the right camera is a personal issue. I dunno...there are a lot of different reasons people buy a camera. The camera companies try very hard to create the desire for people to buy NEW!! NEW! stuff. At times, the product matrix develops a new wrinkle, and suddenly people feel that they "need" a new set-up, for whatever reason.

    Right now, we have a lot of good cameras in a fairly mature market, but if somebody has say a D70, but that small child is now a high-school sports player, buying a MUCH-newer, better at High ISO camera, or a new fast-aperture lens, can make a world of difference in poor lighting.

    The D7100 and D7200 are very mature, very fancy cameras. I would trade a 10-years-old D2x or a D70 for a D7200 in a second.
     
  9. SCraig

    SCraig Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I sold cameras to. But it was back in the days when the Instamatic was king ;)

    Part of the issue these days is that 1) People (especially those newly introduced to cameras) have difficulty getting past the resolution is all that matters syndrome, and 2) There is some overlap in current model lines. As model lines mature features from what were previously higher-end lines are showing up in lines a step down. For instance the removal of the anti-aliasing filter that used to be exclusive to the D800E but is now in the D5300 and D7100. Better autofocus modules, better sensors, better everything eventually filters down to lower-end cameras, which is only logical, but some features tend to remain to differentiate the lines. Weather sealing is rather important to me, as are built-in autofocus motors and built-in flash commanders modes. While I admit that I don't keep up with the different models as well as I should, I don't think any of those features have shown up in a D5xxx body yet.

    Like I said, I'm happy with what I have but that doesn't mean I'll never get something better. The features in the bodies I have now do what I want, but the next generation of bodies may have some whiz-bang toy that I absolutely must have ;)
     
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  10. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    DIZ-ACTLY!!! And that is the kind of camera buyer I always, always loved to see come into the store--one who felt that something new and whiz-bang was what he or she needed! That is the type of customer that the camera manufacturers want to try to create.

    It's important to figure out what each customer is really searching or hoping for. Sometimes there really *is* something that can satisfy that customer's unique needs and wants.

    On TPF I find it tricky often times to figure out what some posters really want. It's often tricky to gauge what their criteria are, and how they rank their criteria, so, gosh...on-line buying recommendations can be dicey if we do not know what the OP wants, or if the OP cannot clearly define what he/she hopes to achieve. Built-in flash commander and in-body focusing motors easily send the OP's right to the mid-level Nikons, straight away. But if they don't mention those things...then the D5300 sounds pretty good.
     
  11. SCraig

    SCraig Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Agreed, but it's a Catch 22 situation. The only people who can define their needs are those buying the camera, yet they usually don't have enough experience or knowledge to even be able to define those needs. With the depth of features available, the various manufacturers having different feature sets (while at the same time yelling that THEIR bodies are the absolute best available), and technology changing so fast it's virtually impossible for anyone, even an experienced photographer, to define what their needs will be now or a year or so down the road.

    My opinion is usually to get something in the middle. Something with a good feature set that will tide them over until they have the experience to know what their needs will be. I don't recommend bottom end bodies nor do I recommend high end bodies. Something along the D5xxx or D7xxx range (or the Canon equivalent) and then let them decide what is missing or what they don't use as time goes by. The bottom line is that nobody can decide for someone else, it's a decision they have to make for themselves.

    We ALL tend to recommend what we use based on the features that are important to us. Full-frame has very little draw for me so I never recommend full frame. Same for the flip-out LCD or emphasis on low-light performance or video capabilities or camera size and weight or a myriad of other features. Some of these have little meaning to me however they might be very important to others.
     

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