D3300 vs D5300 vs D7000

Discussion in 'Nikon Cameras' started by Giwpanski, Dec 31, 2015.

  1. Giwpanski

    Giwpanski TPF Noob!

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    Hey people,
    I have a very big problem. I am frustrated. I am an average photographer and i have decided to buy a new camera. My budget is up to 700 USD. I like photographing animals and portraits. I also like video recording, like shooting a short movie. I can't decide between the D3300, D5300, D7000. If anyone could help me I would be extremely grateful. Which is best to combine zoom photography, portraits and vivid video altogether? Thanks in advance.


     
  2. jcdeboever

    jcdeboever TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Welcome to TPF.

    I have the D3300 and it works fine for me, no complaints as far a picture quality. If I had to do over based on what I have learned, I would have went with the D7xxx series for the way better viewfinder, more focus points, more cross focus points, sealed body, better dynamic range, and built in focus motor. The built in focus motor gives you the ability to use the older AF lenses which can save you some big money. You can use the AF lens on the D3300 as well but it will not auto focus, only manual. The viewfinder is the big deal for me and I never even considered it when looking for a DSLR. Built in focus motor is the other thing that I did not know about. I recently looked through a D7000 viewfinder and was totally bummed and wished I never did. It really makes me want to get rid of the D3300.

    Got this link posted by Derrel some time ago, it lists all the types of Nikon lens and is pretty up to date.
    Nikon Lenses
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2015
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  3. Giwpanski

    Giwpanski TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the swift reply. I am a little bit concerned because D7000 is not that up to date. It has some amazing characteristics but some characteristics are not that amazing, like the processor which is a bit old (Expeed 2). I dont know whether it does a big difference in the photos taken. Also, the quality of the photos taken is significantly lower in comparison with the others. (4928×3264 to 6000×4000). In addition to all that, i have read several forums about the D7000 and the majority of them commented that the video is awful. Also, i have found it for 500€, used with 80.000 clicks. I don't know if that is of any significance but I believe it should be said.
     
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  4. jaomul

    jaomul Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I wouldn't pay 500 for a d7000 with 80k on shutter. I'd imagine you'd get a refurbished or nearly new for that.

    Image quality is not decided by pixel amount.

    The d7000 has some features such as cls and fps which are flash modes that make it more if a camera. It also has an element of weather sealing and more hands on controls.It also can use older lenses that do not have built in motors

    The d5300 is more modern, has a swivel screen, is slightly less in build quality but is a fine camera.

    I'd probably buy the d5300 if the plus points of the d7000 didn't matter to me
     
  5. KmH

    KmH In memoriam Supporting Member

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    I don't relish being the bearer of bad news, but a different camera won't make you a better photographer.
    Many, many other amateur photographers have thought, "My photos will be better if I have a better camera (or lens, or both)."

    The key to better photos is improving you ........ your photography knowledge and skills - composition, use of light, posing, understanding and controlling depth-of-field, understanding how to use the camera's metering and focusing modes, post production skills, and more.

    Plus each genre of photography is usually helped with other ancillary equipment.
    Strobe lighting (flash), reflectors, and diffusers are usually needed for making quality portrait photos.
    For video a different kind of lighting, constant lighting, is needed because flash units cannot recycle anywhere near fast enough to make the 25 or more frames per second of still photographs that are what a video is made of.
    Video is also best shot using a good tripod that has a video fluid head on it.
    Many other accessories are needed to use a DSLR effectively for shooting video - adding a follow focus capability, an external monitor, a good external microphone, and again the list goes on.
     
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  6. Dave442

    Dave442 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Just thinking there is a big difference between shooting some video and a short movie.

    For video, the newest model usually has the best features. The D5500 with kit lens is under $600 right now.
     
  7. astroNikon

    astroNikon 'ya all Bananas I tell 'ya Supporting Member

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    If you plan on doing video then you are probably better off with the d5300.
    With video using older AF lenses doesn't work so well dependent upon the lens. So you have to use AF-S lenses for video. I had a d7000 and loved it though but mainly for photography and not video.

    There's other things you need for video as you advance your skills but you won't get at that price range.
     
  8. Giwpanski

    Giwpanski TPF Noob!

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    I am aware of that. I just need a better camera. I bought the Sony a3000 to find out whether i like photography or not. I now know what i like to do with cameras. So i seek for a better machine.
     
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  9. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    There's this persistent idea around TPF, among some members, that beginner-level cameras are good enough for anybody, and that moving to a mid-level enthusiast's camera, or even a pro-level body, will do nothing to improve one's picture taking or picture-making. I'm here to say that is nonsense.

    I've shot digital slrs since February 2001. The "pro" bodies I have owned, Nikon D1, D1h, D2x, and D3x, have all been easy shooting cameras, with fabulous viewfinder systems, powerful focusing modules for their era of manufacture, and almost instantaneous shutter lag time, as well as industry-leading latency time (how fast the camera's mechanical systems recover for the next shot, not framing rate per se). I have also owned or used a number of cheaper cameras...Fuji S1, Fuji S2, Canon 20D, Nikon D40, Canon 20D, as well as the Canon 5D classic...ALL those were built on either low-end film cameras (S1, S2 from Fuji) or mid-level designs (Canon 5D> EOS Elan). The Fuji S5 Pro was a converted Nikon D200, but it has a substandard viewfinder and a weak AF system overall.

    It's pretty simple. When I switched from the Canon 5D to the Nikon D3x in early 2013, my average success/keeper rate on almost every type of shoot I did tripled. Instantly. In one week. Over the next two and a half years. The pro-level Nikon camera bodies are simply vastly superior to cameras that are mid-level bodies. Everything is faster. Trigger is faster. Mirror comes back faster. Camera shoots as fast as you can think. Focusing is state of the art fast and state of the art reliable. Controls are better, and more external, single use controls over stuff that matters: ISO, white balance, exposure comp.

    When you have to 1) fight the camera all the time or 2) fight the camera occasionally or 3)have a camera that functions in every way as well as is possible to manufacture...it becomes pretty clear that beginner, intermediate, and top-level equipment makes things difficult, or mostly easy but occasionally a hassle, or dead-simple every time.

    The entry-level cameras with single-button control are slower to shoot in manual mode, and occasionally, lead to the dreaded "accidental +/-EC input error," which is something I've diagnosed for four or five noobs on here over the years...pressing the +/- button and spinning the control whell, thinking that they are adjusting the f/stop when they are actually dialing in minus or plus EC.

    I just do not hear people saying that beginner tools are the equal of professional or serious enthusiast tools in other areas of interest. The higher the performance of the inherent, base-level systems in a camera are, the LESS of a limiting factor the camera is in tricky situations. Here's a good example: the Sony RX10 II mirrorless camera pitted against the Nikon D5500 d-slr, at an NCAA women's soccer match in Seattle. The mirrorless Sony achieved 10 percent success rates, the little Nikon mid-level camera achieved a two-thirds success rate! There is no type of education that can overcome a crap AF system. But you can easily BUY your way into a good AF system.

    Beginners and mid-level shooters are the people who, and I have said this for literally years on here, they are the ones that benefit the MOST from having access to higher-end gear. GO shoot a soccer game with a 55-200 Nikon zoom, then try it with a 70-200 VR. One is a PITA, the other works every time. One will struggle to focus at times, the other will almost always lock focus in 1/2 second or so. Experienced shooters can adapt to anything, but beginners will shoot better with better equipment than they do with cheap gear.

    Can a Sony RX10 II keep up with a Nikon D5500 on the soccer field?
     
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  10. Giwpanski

    Giwpanski TPF Noob!

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    Derrel,
    I do not fully aggree with you, because you are right in some parts. What is your suggestion over my issue?
     
  11. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    For "me" one issue I find to be important is how easily I can see the image through the viewfinder.

    Look through the squintly little pentamirrror viewfinder system of a D3xxx or D5xxx body, and compare it agains the better pentaprism viewfinder of the D7xxx series. Then, look through the miniaturized viewfinder of a Canon SL-1. Awful, just awful. The D3xxx and D5xxx viewfinders are atrocious in poor light. Or if you have less than perfect, young eyes. The D7xxx cameras have a better viewfinder, and can use more lenses with autofocus.

    I think the D7000 with 80,000 clicks on it is way overpriced. I would look around in your area to find a good, clean, used camera, or a low-priced refurbished camera. Buy the best camera you can afford, and one that you are willing to carry. D7100 would be my value pick. Used D600 FX would be a great camera as well--fantastic image quality, not too big, it was actually built on the D7000 chassis/body.

    Nikon d-slrs at the low end have better overall, total performance than low-end mirrorless cameras or Canon low-end cameras, due to better sensor technology. Once the Sony and Toshiba sensors hit 16 megapixels, and the 24 MP, the image quality shot way,way up.
     
  12. jcdeboever

    jcdeboever TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    I sure wish I would have came on here before I bought mine. View finder is huge deal for me. I actually prefer to use my Canon T70 over my D3300 just because of the viewfinder. I repeat, I wish I would have never looked through the view finder of a D7000, totally superior to the D3300. It looks like the D600 has an even bigger viewfinder.

    Nikon D600 In-Depth Review
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2015

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