Help with how many photos I give clients!

Discussion in 'General Shop Talk' started by shutterbabe86, Jan 29, 2018.

  1. shutterbabe86

    shutterbabe86 TPF Noob!

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    I have a problem!

    I have so much trouble cutting down the pics I give to my clients after a regular family or senior shoot. I take a lot of lifestyle type photos when shooting and there end up being so many awesome shots that I know *I* would want if it were my family, so instead of giving the client around 10-30 photos for a 30 minute or hour long session I end up giving them like 75-100 because I have such a hard time cutting some out.

    This is a problem! Obviously it's taking up more of my time in editing and I'm sure it can be overwhelming to the client. My question is how do you guys limit the photos you give to the client?

    And on another note, I also have a problem going over my session time. I've spent over an hour with a client when they've only paid for a 30 minute. It doesnt bother me because I want to get certain shots and such, but I know I need to work on timing. How do you guys wrap up your sessions on time? The artist in me wants it to take however long its going to take, but the business side of me knows I cant keep doing this. The artist is more dominant then the business side of myself. :rolleyes:

    Any tips or advice is greatly appreciated. Thank you!


     
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I don't give them any images. They pay for every one they want. Typically, in a one hour session I'll shoot 3-4 poses and 8 - 10 frames per pose. From that, I cull down so that during the proofing session, the client sees 3-4 images per pose from which to choose their final selection.

    Timing... I don't do anything less than a 60 minute session which is usually broken in to two 25 minute shooting sessions with a 10 minute 'shake it out and relax' break in the middle. About 10-15 minutes before the end of the hour, I will let them know by saying, "Well, I think we've got some good stuff so far, is there anything you'd like as we have time for one more pose". or something similar. That said, I never worry to much if it runs a bit over. 30 minutes however is more than a 'bit'.
     
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  3. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Give them however many your contract calls for, and no more unless they specifically ask for some of the culls, and then only if they pay more. All that should be in your contract. How many at what price, (and how much for each additional print, and what sizes, of course.)

    Speaking of culls; maintain your own standards, and do not release anything that does not come up to your standards. Be ruthless in culling your shoot. Show only your best work.

    Set your phone timer to ring at quitting time. The time of your session will also be spelled out in your contract, with a certain hourly rate for overtime. (contingent on your having the slot open)
     
  4. astroNikon

    astroNikon 'ya all Bananas I tell 'ya Supporting Member

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    let me flip the question ...

    How are you taking 100 shots in 30 minutes of a portrait session ??
    What are you looking for before taking an image ?
    Do you have a set list of poses?
    or are you just taking a bunch of pictures are they sit/stand around?
    How do you cull your high end artistic shots from all of them ??

    Can you provide some examples of your Good and Bad ones that you release to the client?
     
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  5. Light Guru

    Light Guru Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Your first issue will be fixed if you fix this issue.

    For a 3 min session do no more then 2-3 poses. For a 60 min session do no more then 4-6 poses.

    It should bother you. You are robbing yourself. You are essentially giving away free photos at that point.
     
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  6. vintagesnaps

    vintagesnaps Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Sounds like you might need to rethink how you're scheduling time for sessions. Maybe you need to think about what photos you're trying to get and streamline. I can't imagine someone needing that many photos to choose from; I'd think too many choices could make it harder for someone to pick what they want.

    I guess it takes stepping back and looking at the photos from a more objective perspective. I've had photos sometimes that I like, but have to accept they belong in my personal collection. Or that something that isn't working, has to go... lol
     
  7. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    How are you showing the customer the images you have decided to show them? Online or in person?
     

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