Microphone similar to the Rode Videomic Pro

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by samsam123, Feb 17, 2017.

  1. samsam123

    samsam123 TPF Noob!

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    Recently I got the Rode Videomic Go and I had to return it because of a hissing sound that it produced with my Canon EOS 700D

    So far I want to buy the Rode Videomic Pro because you can almost silence the sound that comes from your camera and make the sound that is recorded by the microphone louder, my question is, are there any other microphones for dslr cameras that also got this option?


     
  2. Dave Colangelo

    Dave Colangelo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I have had really good results with the Audio Technica shotguns, but that are more expensive and in my experience well worth it (at least the ones I can vouch for). They make one thats in the price range of the Rode that may be worth checking out, I have never used it but I will say I really like their other stuff.

    Ill also offer some general notes on buzz. First off most of the condenser style hot shoe mount shotgun mics draw their power from an internal battery. They generally come pre-loaded with a less than ideal battery. Trying another battery may yield better/cleaner results.

    Some times the buzz in the mic is not actually in the mic but in the room. Things like florescent lights, small electronics transformers and other similar units can cause a lot of buzz. The buzz you hear may simply be buzz you were not picking up with the internal microphone.

    Some amount of buzz should always be assumed when shooting video anywhere that is not a pro set. Post production work will be required to clean up the audio in almost all cases. Finalcut has some nice automatic buzz reducing but just about any video editor should allow for some audio work as well. You can use an EQ to isolate the buzz frequency and pull it down if need be.

    Regards
    Dave
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2017
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