My oil pastel work

Discussion in 'The Creative Corner' started by terri, Jun 18, 2019.

  1. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Okay, I'm starting this thread so I don't interfere with @snowbear and his ink work thread, even though he invites me to hijack it periodically. :pumpformylove:

    I started messing around with oil pastels as another medium for hand coloring B&W photographs. I never really warmed up to them for that, though. Unlike actual photo oils, which are made to be transparent enough to allow the photograph to show through, oil pastels are quite opaque - like crayons, which they resemble. When I first had a play, the idea of actually covering the photo and having to do any drawing myself to make sense of the image was terrifying. Drawing is not my forte, and I've had scant training.

    A couple of them *kind of* worked, but meh.
    Here's one of the first things I tried. I had a photo I took on a very bright day with a Holga - limited camera controls, so it's totally blown out. But the negative did at least show this very cool, ancient electric plant built on Lake Superior:

    Electric plant Lake Superior.jpg

    Horrible negative, with nothing good to come from it. I scanned it anyway, and printed it out to try again with the oil pastels, just made it more a nighttime scene:

    electricplantLkSuperior.JPG

    So, not a total loss of the negative, but not very good, either. ;) Since then, I've just tried to get away from using bad photos to paint over, and figuring out how a non-painter/sketcher like me could still have fun with a medium like this.

    In my own little art journey, I've been studying some of Picasso's work and doing some reading. I never liked much of his stuff (and I'm still not a huge fan of analytical cubism - the earlier form of this style), but I do like quite a lot of his other work, especially portraits. It seems very liberating to not have to think about being anatomically correct. :lol:

    With this in mind, I decided to use another one of my photos for a reference - which, btw, is actually a B&W photo that I took of my husband and later hand painted with photo oils. (Why yes, I did have to mention that. The skin tones and hair came out great!) :icon_mrgreen:

    Here's the photo:
    Brad at the festival, hand colored.jpg


    And here is the oil pastel painting I made from it, Picasso-style:


    Brad realizes something.jpg

    I wasn't going to try to draw any of that background or do anything, really, too much like the photo. So it was just a lot of fun - and btw, he loves it! So I view this one as a success.

    I've scanned or photographed most of my stuff. Oil pastels can be slick and messy, so not much scanning anymore. Most of what I do is from some kind of photo reference, though not all.


     
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  2. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Your cubist portrait _is a success_.
     
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  3. Jeff15

    Jeff15 TPF junkie!

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    Very clever portrait...............
     
  4. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Here's another one where I used one of my photos as a reference. A cell phone shot of part of the beach at Mackinac Island:
    Mac Island beach.jpg

    Eww, that file is bigger than I thought. :lol:


    Here is the oil pastel painting I did, working from that. I was interested in the long shadows, as well as trying to paint water.

    Mackinac Island beach.jpg

    I kind of screwed up the little people, proportionally, but it was still a good exercise for me. I had only white paper at the time, and I did an underpainting of burnt sienna to try for some depth of color. It kind of bleeds through the sand color, as well as the water. Good practice.
     
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  5. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Thank you, Derrel, Jeff! Nice of you to comment.

    I have a long way to go.
     
  6. Jeff15

    Jeff15 TPF junkie!

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    A nice beach too................
     
  7. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    I like the beach shot's translation into oil.
     
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  8. stapo49

    stapo49 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I am not really into cubism but really like the beach painting.

    Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
     
  9. snowbear

    snowbear fuzzy-wuzzy Supporting Member

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    Thanks for posting these. I really need to spend more time on the art - half-way hoping that will be my final career (something to do if I ever really retire). :D

    I LOVE the beach scene and the portrait; excellent job on the hand painting, as well. Water is not easy to paint, at least it isn't for me.

    I still have some pastel pieces around from when I was taking classes; I may dig them out and play.
     
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  10. jcdeboever

    jcdeboever TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Nicely executed. I used to burn through Senneller oil pastels back in the day. I tried a lot of different brands and nothing was even close.
     
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  11. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Lovely work, Terri. I've always wished I had the ability to do stuff like this.
     
  12. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Understood; it's not everyone's cuppa. But just for fun - consider that Picasso could - and did - paint like Raphael by the time he was 15. And his brain was pondering other things, particularly when it came to portraits:

    “Are we to paint what’s on the face, what’s inside the face, or what’s behind it?”

    "What is a face really? Its own photo? Its makeup? Or is it a face as painted by such or such painter? That which is in front? Inside? Behind? And the rest? Doesn't everyone look at himself in his own particular way? Deformations simply do not exist.” ― Picasso, Picasso Notebook

    Though I'm far from complete understanding, I take those as a sort of bridge over to the paintings he came up with. :) Thanks for commenting!
     

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